journalism

Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture 2017

Steve Hewlett, the distinguished media commentator and programme maker, passed away on 20 February this year after a very public battle with cancer.  He lived his last days through memorable encounters with Eddie Mair on PM and BBC Radio Four and his cancer diary in the Observer.

His good friend Nick Robinson, BBC Radio Four Today presenter and former Political Editor for the BBC, will give the inaugural Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture on 28 September at the University of Westminster.

Freed Al Jazeera English journalist collects RTS award

Baher Mohamed

Al Jazeera English journalist Baher Mohamed has finally been presented with his RTS Television Journalism Judges' Award in Qatar.

Mohamed, along with his colleagues Peter Greste and Mohamed Fahmy, were recognised at the RTS Television Journalism Awards in February this year.

Greste was present at the ceremony, however Mohamed and Fahmy had to watch via satellite link from Cairo due to strict bail conditions.

How to become a news camera operator

(Image courtesy of Dai Baker)

Channel 4 News cameraman Dai Baker has travelled around the world, including a ten-year stint at the broadcaster’s Washington bureau.  

He’s now based in Wales where, alongside a reporter and producer, he films and edits news packages from Wales and the West Country - although he’s always on standby to go further afield, covering the inauguration of Donald Trump in the USA and the political protests in Barcelona (see video below). 

My RTS Bursary Diary: Paula Melissa Ugochukwu

When I learnt of the Royal Television Society (RTS) bursaries in 2015, I knew I had to apply. Any organisation actively committed to the diversification and inclusion of underrepresented groups within the British media will always hold a place in my heart. Plus, being part of the RTS is a great opportunity to network with media industry leaders - an opportunity that I was very unlikely to stumble across as a young black woman, from a low-income family.

Ashley John-Baptiste: Giving a voice to the voiceless

"Working on Grenfell was… oh gosh, how do I even articulate that?” asks Ashley John-Baptiste, the 28-year-old reporter who led the coverage of the tower block fire and its devastating aftermath for BBC Two’s Victoria Derbyshire programme last summer. “It was hard to switch off,” he admits.

Originally dispatched to west London to find residents who would speak to Victoria Derbyshire live on the programme, he revisited the area multiple times, meeting survivors and building a rapport with the community.

Meet...Ashley John-Baptiste

Ashley had his first experience in front of the camera as an X Factor finalist with boy band The Risk shortly after graduating from Cambridge University.

After leaving the music show during the live finals, he was asked to front a documentary on life in the care system and his own experiences in care. It was this experience working on the BBC Three documentary that sparked his ambition to become a journalist.

Winners of the RTS Television Journalism Awards 2018 announced

The BBC News team with their award for International News Coverage (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

Victoria Derbyshire took home two awards for Network Presenter and Interview of the Year for her powerful interview with football abuse victims.

Sky News won the News Channel of the Year award in a closely contested category, and was also presented with the Breaking News award for its remarkable coverage of the Manchester Terror Attack. CNN International was rewarded with Scoop of the Year for its courageous and enterprising storytelling about the Libya Slave Market.

Jeremy Thompson: The buccaneer

If television news had a golden age, it was surely the three decades from around 1980. Driven by videotape newsgathering, growth in satellite capacity and buoyant budgets, news bulletins often drew audiences of 15 million. They were the main way that most people got their news. This was Jeremy Thompson’s time, and mine, too.

Thompson came up the old-fashioned way: straight from school into local newspapers and radio before BBC TV, ITN and Sky News. His father, an insurance man, was horrified at his son’s career choice, warning that only jazz musicians were a worse actuarial risk.