journalism

Deborah Turness: Reinventing TV news

Deborah Turness

Deborah Turness, the former editor of ITV News, ex-President of NBC News and now boss of Euronews, admits that there are parallels in her working and domestic lives. She is, she says, a serial renovator. She bought a place in Shepherd’s Bush and turned it into a family home just before her first daughter was born, and then did the same thing in Chiswick, just before her second.

Journalists offer advice to Southern students

BBC South broadcast journalist Sophia Seth offers advice to student (Credit: Gordon Cooper)

It is one of the best forums for students to meet working journalists to discuss current opportunities and career development. And, to prove the point, three of the 15 journalists at the event had attended as students in the past two years. In fact, one gained her job with Sky News as a result of the contact she made as a student in 2017.

The professionals included on-screen and online staff from BBC South, ITV Meridian and Sky News, as well as reporters from BBC Radio Solent and the Portsmouth News.

RTS Student Masterclasses: Journalism with Clive Myrie

Clive Myrie (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

The importance of role models

 “I’m a Northerner (Myrie was brought up in Bolton) and didn’t come from a media family. I was a second generation immigrant. (My parents) didn’t want me to become a journalist. 

"They wanted me to be a lawyer or a dentist, a respectable middle-class job for their first-born child born in the United Kingdom.

"Around the age of nine I had a paper round, I read the products that I was lobbing over the garden fences and as a result of that got interested in the world.  

Channel 4 News announces new Facebook Watch show

(Credit: Channel 4)

Channel 4 News has announced a partnership with Facebook to produce a new weekly news show.

Uncovered is an in-depth news and analysis programme that will see Channel 4 News correspondents shedding light on unreported stories in 10-minute episodes.

The series will focus on one major international issue each week and is due to premier in the new year.

It is the latest commission for Facebook’s funded news shows initiative to tackle fake news and will be available on Facebook Watch.

So you want to work in observational documentaries?

Havana Marking, Peter Beard, Lizzie Kempton and Peter Dale (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)
At an RTS Futures event in early November, National Film and Television School head of documentaries  Peter Dale chaired a debate on what it takes to be a great observational documentary film-maker. 

One of the panel, Lizzie Kempton, was the assistant producer on the Grierson Award-winning BBC Two film, How to Die: Simon’s Choice, which tells the story of a man with an aggressive form of motor neurone disease who chooses to end his life.

Dorothy Byrne’s TV Diary

Dorothy Byrne at the 2018 Television Journalism Awards (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

TV current affairs and documentaries are obsessed with the new. That means we can ignore problems which continue over decades. My month begins with watching Channel 5’s Raped: My Story for a panel I’m on.

It’s a really daring programme precisely because there is nothing new in it; it is a devastating document of the way rape ruins lives and survivors are denied justice. And that’s a story we need to tell again and again.

How to become a news camera operator

(Image courtesy of Dai Baker)

Channel 4 News cameraman Dai Baker has travelled around the world, including a ten-year stint at the broadcaster’s Washington bureau.  

He’s now based in Wales where, alongside a reporter and producer, he films and edits news packages from Wales and the West Country - although he’s always on standby to go further afield, covering the inauguration of Donald Trump in the USA and the political protests in Barcelona (see video below).