BBC

The Great British Break Off: Will you still watch?

Contract negotiations with the BBC broke down when the corporation reportedly wouldn't match Channel 4's offer.

The shock announcement was followed by the news that presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc would not be following the show after it left BBC One. Star judges Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood have not yet confirmed if they will stay with the production.  

'Life in the Air' - Why Bristol Leads the World in Natural History film-making

This is your chance to meet the NHU face to face; view excerpts from and discuss their latest visual feast, 'Life in the Air'; and find out more about wildlife film-making by putting questions to some of their most experienced producers on anything from innovative shooting techniques and specialist equipment to their approach to ethical issues and social media.

Who Benefits? How can poverty be better portrayed on TV

This conference will consider the portrayal of poverty on television; it is being held by the BBC, The Royal Television Society, NCVO and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Who Benefits? will be chaired by BBC Breakfast presenter, Louise Minchin. We'll be looking at some of the reality TV and documentary programmes that have been made in poorer communities: what they are, how they are made, and why audiences watch them.

New music series seeks fan memorabilia

PHOP punks

From drumsticks to diary entries, new BBC Four series the People’s History of Pop (PHOP) will look at the evolution of music through the eyes of its fans.

The series will be split into four episodes, to air throughout 2016, each focusing on a different decade of pop history.

In an industry first, production company 7 Wonder is working with Historypin, a user-generated digital archive of historical artefacts, to collate music memorabilia from fans across the country.

Campbell Swinton Lecture: Claire Enders, Enders Analysis

Campbell Swinton was one of Scotland’s pioneers of television technology whose legacy RTS continues to celebrate with a series of high level lectures. The last two speakers were then SNP leader Alex Salmond and BBC Scotland Director Ken MacQuarrie.

Rising above the political fray in Westminster and Holyrood, Claire Enders will explain the purpose and foundations of the PSB system of producing and commissioning news and current affairs, quality entertainment and documentaries, sustained by the BBC, C4, ITV, STV and C5.

BBC renews Killing Eve for a third series

The announcement comes just days after the US premiere of series two, which aired on BBC America and AMC on Sunday 7th April.

Killing Eve, which follows MI5 agent Eve (Sandra Oh ) on the hunt for assassin Villanelle (Jodie Comer), was a break out hit in 2018, with BBC iPlayer receiving over 46 million requests for series one of the drama so far.

BBC opens applications for Content Commissioner development programme

(Credit: BBC)

The broadcasting company is offering six training placements for talented TV professionals with a disability, and those from black, Asian, and minority backgrounds, to develop their commissioning skills.

Now in it’s third year, the six-month programme will place applicants into one of the BBC’s commissioning teams, including BBC Two, Arts, Drama, Entertainment, Popular Factual and Specialist Factual.

The Interrogation of Tony Martin wins big at West of England Awards 2019

RTS Award Winner David Nath (Credit: Jon Craig/@JonCraig_Photos)

David Nath – the co-founder of Story Films – picked up the Director award, while Joe Carey won the Editing prize. Nath’s script for the programme was taken verbatim from the police interview recordings of Tony Martin, the Norfolk farmer who shot a fleeing burglar dead in 1999. The judges described it as a “truly exciting piece of television, so well done technically and very well cast”.

Our Friend in the North West: Cat Lewis talks production centres in the UK

Cat Lewis

As TV producers, we’re facing more global competition than ever before. Whenever they wish, viewers can watch one of many programmes from around the world on Netflix or Amazon, rather than one of our shows. Or they can stream or download dozens of feature films available via their TV sets.

I genuinely believe that the best response to this difficult situation is to embrace the creativity of the whole country, and not just rely on London­based programme-makers.