BBC

Strengthening trust in the BBC following the Dyson report

Credit: BBC

It feels like remote history, but it’s true: 27.1 million people watched Boris Johnson announce the first lockdown for the UK on 23 March last year. The sequel in May, announcing the path out of lockdown, attracted an even larger audience of 27.5 million, while the PM’s announcement of a repeat of lockdown in January this year drew a slightly smaller audience – as repeats tend to – of “only” 25.2 million. 

Paul Mescal talks mental health, complex love and that famous silver chain

Credit: BBC

The role of Connell Waldron was his first acting credit outside of drama school and the buzz around his performance is still continuing over a year later. 

“To still be in the conversation is really exciting and gratifying,” says Mescal, who was nominated for an RTS Award for his role in the hit series.  

Mescal’s meteoric rise to stardom at the start of a global pandemic is far from the ‘conventional’ way to break into the industry. 

BBC releases first look images of Jamie Dornan in The Tourist

Jamie Dornan (Credit: BBC)

The six-part thriller sees Jamie Dornan (The Fall) as a British man who is ruthlessly pursued through the unforgiving Australian outback by a tank truck determined to drive him off the road. 

This leads to a dangerous cat and mouse game, which sees The Man end up seriously wounded in hospital but miraculously alive. 

He may be alive, but he can no longer remember who he is and dark figures from his past are still chasing him. 

Normal People's Daisy Edgar-Jones talks awkward auditions, literary adaptations and Where The Crawdads Sing

Credit: BBC

With the world stuck indoors, the adaptation of Sally Rooney's best-selling novel was the perfect recipe for a lockdown sensation. It captured the hearts of viewers, before breaking them and putting them back together again. 

Before its television debut, Normal People already had a loyal legion of literary fans, including star Daisy Edgar-Jones. 

Danny Boy Preview and Q&A

Actor Toby Jones, director Sam Miller, writer Robert Jones and executive producer Sue Horth discuss the making of factual drama Danny Boy, the story of a young man’s journey from medal-winning hero to alleged killer, and his search for truth in the fog of war. 

The royal watch

“Modernisation” is a dangerous word for broadcasters when it comes to coverage of the Royal Family. So, too, is “journalism” if it intrudes too far into the ceremonial. Both are immediately construed by critics, especially those who like to bash the BBC, to mean the abandonment of tradition and a lack of respect for the monarchy. 

Our Friend in the North West: Cat Lewis

MediaCity in Salford, Greater Manchester, began its rapid expansion into a world-­leading TV production centre 10 years ago, when BBC staff moved in soon after Dock 10 launched its new studios and post-production business.

Back in 2007, when Salford City Council and the Peel Group won their joint bid to house the BBC’s new northern base, I received a call from a very animated Felicity Goodey, the main visionary behind the project.