Birmingham

Terry Stanton celebrates 50 years RTS service

Dorothy Hobson and Terry Stanton (Credit: Jenny Wilkes)

The TV veteran received a certificate from Midlands vice-chair Dorothy Hobson. “I hope to remain active to at least 2036 when it is my aspiration to organise a lecture for the RTS entitled ‘Television: the first 100 years’,” he said.

Terry Stanton’s interest in television began at an early age when his father bought a Marconi set to watch the funeral of King George VI in 1952.

What's next for Ultra-HD TV?

The first Ultra-HD sets simply increased the resolution, but the new format offers much more to television audiences. Both high dynamic range and a wider colour gamut are features of the latest TV sets in the shops.

At the Midlands event in mid-January, Salmon, lead research engineer at BBC R&D, discussed the principles of Ultra-HD television and, in particular, the greater range of colours – the wider colour gamut – available on new TV sets.

Sci-fi writer shares tips for success

Phil Ford

Birmingham-born writer Phil Ford – the co-creator, with Russell T Davies, of CBBC series Wizards vs Aliens – discussed his career in front of an audience of RTS Midlands and Writers’ Guild members in October.

Ford was quizzed by BBC One Midlands Today presenter Joanne Malin at the BBC Academy in Birmingham, with the conversation covering his TV work and valuable insights into the craft of writing.

Local TV: Here to stay

London Live's Gavin Ramjaun

If you were to believe the headlines, you might think that local television – dismis­sed by some as "Jeremy Hunt’s pipe dream" – was dead in the water. The former Culture Secretary’s vision, scorned by most broadcasters, was bulldozed on to the statute book four years ago and the first channels are now 18 months old.

Hunt thought it wrong that Birmingham, Alabama, had eight local-TV ­stations while Birmingham, UK, had none, and secured some funding and the Channel 8 slot on Freeview (in England, at least) to help the new stations get established.