RTS Northern Ireland

Good design wins viewers, says Pascual Diaz

Talking to students at Belfast Metropolitan College, Diaz said: “Because we live in a very visual world, design has a key [role] in delivering our content... [and] attracting the attention of our audience.

We can also communicate our content through social media... in a visual way.”

Diaz, a native of Spain, has worked in the UK for the past decade. Good design, he said, should be “integrated in the content.... If nobody notices the design, it’s a good thing.”

Winners of the 2021 RTS Northern Ireland Student Television Awards 2021 announced

Ulster University Belfast picked up the Animation Award for The Forlorn Piscator by Matthew McGuigan. A highly commended award also went to Antisocial Behaviour by Lyndsay Clarke and Phillip Steele from the Northern Regional College, Coleraine.

The Non-Scripted Award winner was The Rising of Jordan Adetunji by Joe Warden, Nathan Emery and Reece Williams from Ulster University. Isolation - Overcoming Adversity as a Community by Aodhan Roberts from the North West Regional College was highly commended in this category.

How Waddell Media is riding out the coronavirus storm

Little on TV cheers up audiences more than seeing animals brought back to health, so Waddell Media’s new series Work on the Wild Side is coming to screens at just the right time.

The 20 one-hour shows will be stripped across the daytime week on Channel 4 from mid-May. They follow vets and volunteers who have given up their jobs in the UK and moved to South Africa to rescue animals, and reintroduce them to the wild.

RTS Futures NI hosts TV and film workshops

Film and TV crafts and skills workshops (Credit: Ronan Karicos)

The first event, “Sketchy business: making it in animation”, brought together a panel hosted by the university’s Dr Helen Haswell and featured three experts from Belfast animation house JAM Media: visual effects supervisor and director Niall Mooney; animator Jessica Patterson; and animation director Simon Kelleghan. They discussed how to get your foot in the door, as well as giving practical advice, including how best to structure a show reel.

Creators reveal the magic behind Game Of Thrones artwork

Helen Thompson (Credit: Cilleán Campbell)

Supervising art director Paul Ghirardani – who brought one of his Emmy Awards with him – was joined by artist Daniel Blackmore and draughtsman Owen Black at the session, which was jointly hosted by Belfast Design Week.

The trio gave presentations about their roles in the art department, before the session host, Film Hub NI project manager Hugh Odling-Smee, led a panel discussion and Q&A with the 80-strong audience.

Belfast’s Titanic Studios has been the main studio and post-production facility for all eight series of Game of Thrones.

Belfast workshops season a ‘huge success’

The "project children" featured in the documentary "How To Defuse a Bomb – The Project Children Story" (Credit: RTÉ)

Alleycats head of production Judy Wilson kicked off the season with the session, “How to manage a production”. Over almost five years at the indie, she has worked on many projects, including the BBC NI/ RTÉ documentary, How to Defuse a Bomb: The Project Children Story.

 

Ryan Kernaghan, the director of photography on revenge thriller Bad Day for the Cut, offered a crash course in camera and lightning techniques, explaining to the students in the audience how they should prepare for a shoot. 

 

Behind the scenes at Belfast’s Yorkgate Cinema

Yorkgate, which switched to digital projection five years ago, is a huge multiplex with 14 screens. The Centre saw a mix of Barco 2K-12C and Barco 4K-23B digital projectors, although as Brenden Leaden, IT manager at the cinema explained, the majority of films shown are still shot in 2K.

The Barco projectors are lamp-based with a xenon light source, suitable for screens up to 12 metres wide, and are based on Texas Instruments’ digital light processing cinema chip.