journalism

Next generation of TV journalism

Photography: Paul Reich

This Wednesday saw The Royal Television Society bring together four generations of journalism; from current students, young journalists beginning their careers, established professionals and affectionately titled “elder statesmen”, to celebrate and showcase some of the amazing work by the three nominees for Young Journalist of the Year in this year’s RTS Scotland Awards on 17th May.

Meet James Longman, Broadcast Journalist

At the age of 24, James travelled to Syria to report on the early days of conflict and wrote for several UK newspapers including The Telegraph while there. 

A fluent Arabic and French speaker, Longman has worked as Beirut Correspondent for the BBC on the conflict in Syria and the Middle East and has reported on terrorist incidents across Europe, including two weeks of continuous live reporting during the terrorist attacks in Paris and Nice.

The fight against fake news

Any politician who uses the words ‘fake news’ to describe something they don’t like from their opponent should be assaulted verbally by people in their own party and fellow parliamentarians – we have to fight for language,” Nick Robinson told an RTS early-evening event discussing false news and alternative facts.

At the event in late February, chaired by former ITN chief executive Stewart Purvis, Robinson argued for the continuation of “impartiality as a legal requirement for television news”.

Winners of the RTS Television Journalism Awards 2017 announced

RTS Awards

Channel 4 News took home a raft of awards including Daily News Programme of the Year and Television Journalist of the Year, which was awarded to Matt Frei

Syrian film-maker Waad al-Kateab was at the ceremony having been granted a visa by the Foreign Office to travel here after leaving Syria. She received the Young Talent of the Year Award and was also awarded the prize for Camera Operator of the Year – the first time this award has been won by a female.

Jeremy Bowen: You don’t just go to wars for the sake of it

“It’s an all-consuming job which can be immensely satisfying, but it demands a great deal and you have to be prepared to make that commitment… Sounds awful [but] it’s a lot of fun and you get to travel and someone else pays for it.”

Bowen has become a household name during his 33 year career at the BBC, reporting from conflict zones across the world. He can still reel off the names of the hotels he’s stayed in while reporting from El Salvador, Bosnia, Croatia and Iraq. “I’m a bit obsessed with hotels,” he admits.

BBC News launches recruitment scheme for journalists with disabilities

Credit: BBC

BBC News’ Mobile and Online teams will create twelve new positions across a wide range of content for people with disabilities, including broadcast journalists and assistant editors.

The scheme will include bespoke training and a mentoring programme, and at least half of the roles will become permanent at the end of the year.

Information about how to apply will be available shortly on the BBC Careers website.

Tea Break Tips - News Broadcasting

Journalist and news broadcaster Charlene White shares her tips on how to break into the world of news broadcasting. She has a strong background working in news broadcasting across multiple platforms and became the youngest senior broadcast journalist for the BBC at the age of 24. Charlene currently works for ITN as a news anchor for ITV News.