Dispatches

Dorothy Byrne’s TV Diary

Dorothy Byrne at the 2018 Television Journalism Awards (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

TV current affairs and documentaries are obsessed with the new. That means we can ignore problems which continue over decades. My month begins with watching Channel 5’s Raped: My Story for a panel I’m on.

It’s a really daring programme precisely because there is nothing new in it; it is a devastating document of the way rape ruins lives and survivors are denied justice. And that’s a story we need to tell again and again.

Story first: how to edit for television

Claire Foy as Queen Elizabeth II (Credit: Netflix)

For scripted projects such as dramas and comedies, an editor will have a script to work to, choosing the best combination of shots to tell the story.

“The script is like a blueprint,” explains The Crown editor Una Ni Dhonghaile,

A documentary is a rather different beast. “You may be faced with 400 hours of footage shot across many years in a sprawling way. The people making the film don't know what's going to happen next,” says editor Ben Stark whose credits include Dispatches, Baby P: The Untold Story and 9/11: The Falling Man.

Channel 4 explores the World According to President Trump

The World According to President Trump will see RTS award-winner Matt Frei talking to those in the know in an attempt to get to the bottom of what a Trump presidency means.

Will Trump really seek to ban all Muslims from entering the United States? Will he actually build The Wall? What will the US-Russia relationship look like?