RTS London

NBCUniversal International named lead sponsor of RTS London Conference 2016

As leader of one of the world’s largest media and entertainment companies, Burke will share his views on global media trends, how NBCUniversal is capitalising on shifts in consumer, technological and market dynamics, and his expectations for the future.

 

RTS London Student Awards 2016

This year's RTS London Student Awards Ceremony will be hosted by Ore Oduba, the rising star of sports broadcasting and a regular face on the UK’s leading morning news programme, BBC Breakfast,

Tickets are available for the nominees and their university staff, with 20 available on ballot for members to attend and network with the next generation of TV creatives.

David Abraham delivers RTS London Christmas Lecture 2019

David Abraham (Credit: Phil Barnes)

Speaking at the RTS London Christmas Lecture, he predicted that despite the growth of streaming services a lot of people would still be watching live, scheduled TV in a decade.

He said: “In ten years’ time linear TV will be distributed by IPTV, but scheduled TV will still be important, that more passive way of consuming curated content will have a very important role, not least in news and entertainment.”

Leading animators share their tips for mastering the craft

Neil Kidney, Elmaz Ekrem, Terry Marsh, Christine MacKay and Will Cook (Credit: Phil Barnes)

“Make your face known… just apply and pitch for stuff, even if you might feel out of your depth,” said young 2D animator and film-maker Elmaz Ekrem. “Someone will eventually take a chance on you.”

Ekrem’s film (made with Dominika Ożyńska) about the refugee crisis in Europe, The Law of The Sea, was part of Channel 4’s short-film strand, Random Acts.

The four-strong panel offered advice to the many young animators in the audience.

Making professional productions on the go

Deirdre Mulcahy at the University of Westminster (Credit: RTS London/Phil Barnes)

The freelance producer and trainer gave a demonstration of the smartphone’s filming capability at an RTS London event in early November.

“No matter how big the tool, it comes down to the person who is actually using [it],” said Mulcahy. “Storytelling is about where the focus is – and understanding how you shoot.”

TikTok: The bridge between broadcasters and Gen Z?

Twist and Pulse, winners of Britain's Got Talent: The Champions (Credit: ITV/Syco/Thames)

“There’s a huge opportunity for news broadcasters to tell the softer or more interesting stories through the platform – also [stories] that aren’t necessarily so time relevant. That’s basically what our audience want,” said Edward Lindeman, TikTok’s European strategy manager.

“I don't really want to go on the platform and hear about [Brexit] – but I am interested in learning new things and discovering content.”

IBC review 2019 explores the rise of the FAANGS

Robert Ambrose, consulting editor of IBC 2019, spent much of his time working with content producers. Looking back at September’s conference, he argued there was clear evidence that the industry is going through a period of disruptive change and uncertainty, as content owners try to figure out new business models to deliver content.

This was particularly focused on delivering content direct to the consumer and building a successful subscription streaming service. Both gained lots of coverage at IBC.

RTS London reflect on this year's RTS Cambridge Convention

Reed Hastings and Kirsty Wark (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

The late-September event was hosted by the University of Westminster, and chaired by media producer and consultant Aradhna Tayal. It featured Bloomberg media reporter Joe Mayes, London Centre Chair Phil Barnes and James Cordell, a London committee member and first-time attendee at the convention.

The panel noted that one of the key themes throughout was the rise of streaming and whether the already established subscription video on demand (SVoD) companies – with more set to enter the market – will dominate the UK broadcast industry.