RTS London

NBCUniversal International named lead sponsor of RTS London Conference 2016

As leader of one of the world’s largest media and entertainment companies, Burke will share his views on global media trends, how NBCUniversal is capitalising on shifts in consumer, technological and market dynamics, and his expectations for the future.

 

RTS London Student Awards 2016

This year's RTS London Student Awards Ceremony will be hosted by Ore Oduba, the rising star of sports broadcasting and a regular face on the UK’s leading morning news programme, BBC Breakfast,

Tickets are available for the nominees and their university staff, with 20 available on ballot for members to attend and network with the next generation of TV creatives.

RTS London learns how AI could shape broadcasting

Very broadly, AI is teaching computers to “learn” from data without being programmed (rather as humans do) –  so-called “machine learning”. 
 
Ian Whitfield, founder of Virtual AI and ex­ ITV director of technology, explained how his company’s systems enhance the automation of back-office processes that are fundamental to broadcast TV: “In channel scheduling, many of the repetitive and time­consuming tasks can be done by robots.” 
 

Building a Buzz: What makes a good PR campaign?

Chaired by Trevor Morris, Professor of Public Relations at Richmond University and former CEO of Chime Public Relations, the event showcased the work of three PR experts.

They included Taylor Herring managing partner James Herring, who admitted that public relations cannot work miracles in television: “The product needs to be great – if you’ve got a terrible TV show, you can have the best PR campaign in the world and no one will be there for the second episode.”

Will archives survive digitisation?

ARCHIVE MONTAGE

At a joint event put on by RTS London and the Federation of Commercial, Audiovisual Libraries (FOCAL) in late February, the experts said that – although it is a huge task – they would be able to digitise the best of telly’s vast archive of tape programmes. 

Steve Daly, head of technology at BBC Archives described his job as “looking after everything the BBC would like to keep forever”. This includes paper records, radio archives, sheet music, social media archive and music libraries, as well as telly programmes.

Event Report: Update TV skills conference

Supported by the BBC Academy and Women in Film and Television UK, “Update TV skills” explained to people who have taken a career break how television has changed and what they need to know to make a successful return.

The day began with a presentation from Rowan de Pomerai, head of flexible delivery at Ooyala, which helps broadcasters and media companies manage the end-to-end digital workflow that is becoming the standard way of organising the production and distribution of TV programmes.

Visual effects aid creativity, say TV craft gurus

A panel of experts discussed the use of visual effects in TV – both real and CGI – and argued that, used responsibly, they aid creativity.

Visual effects have moved on apace over the past two decades. Graeme Harper first directed Doctor Who in 1984, although as a floor assistant at the BBC in the 1960s he worked on the series when Patrick Troughton was the Time Lord.

“The Doctor Who [series] of the 1980s were great because the stories were great – we all forgave them that the sets creaked,” said Harper.

The changing face of media: What comes next?

In a digital age, how we consume content is constantly changing and it has become increasingly difficult to predict the future of content consumption.

At the recent IABM Conference in early December the topic of how under 30s consume content was discussed on a small panel chaired by John Ive, IABM’s Director of Technology & Strategic Insight.