YouTube

Social Media Muscles in on TV

The way we access content is fundamentally changing.  Shorter-form content continues to grow apace and, at the same time, viewing is fragmenting across myriad devices and screens.  Helping drive this change has been the emergence of a new generation of distribution platforms that blend professional video, user generated content and social media.

Digital gurus hail 'most exciting time' for online video

YouTube and Facebook, which between them boast 19 billion daily views worldwide, offer huge online platforms to video content producers but television is also entering the market.

Sky’s new TV service Sky Q includes an online video section, bringing together content from many digital creators, including Barcroft Media, Red Bull Media House and GoPro. And youth brand Vice recently announced that its first European linear TV channel, Viceland, would launch in September.

Beyond YouTube: What are the new online channels?

MCNs are big business, with the leaders among them like Vice, Maker Studios, Red Bull and Fullscreen proving adept at reaching young people, often reaching hundreds of millions of viewers globally.

Having traditionally built their audiences for online stars like PewDiePie and Zoella principally through YouTube, MCNs are increasingly branching out to find new audience on other platforms, including Facebook, as well as more traditional outlets like theatrical-release films and TV channels.

A global shift to home-grown

Netflix commissions from Germany, India and Spain

The old saying “Think global, act local” is the new mantra for the Net­flix-led, global tech platforms as they push for ever greater numbers of subscribers. In recent months, Net­flix, Apple and Amazon have all started to open offices, staffed largely by locally grown TV commissioners, in the UK and other non-US markets. Simultaneously, the tech platforms are ramping up local marketing efforts.

Amazon has also jumped into local sports markets, purchasing major live sports rights for the UK, including a Premier League football package and US Open tennis rights.

All about editing: Blue Planet II's editor on how he put together some of the show's iconic scenes

(Credit: BBC)

Like most editors, Matt Meech started out as a runner, working at a post-production house in Soho where he spent his spare time learning how to use editing software Avid.  

Matt put together a showreel which impressed his bosses enough for them to give him a job as an assistant editor. 

BT to broadcast first episode of The Terror on YouTube

(Credit: AMC)

The show, originally aired on AMC in America and is, in part, based on the true story of two ships, HMS Terror and HMS Erebus, which became trapped in the icy Northwest passage whilst mapping the Arctic coastline in the 19th Century. The series also draws inspiration from Dan Simmons' 2007 best-selling novel of the same name. It combines the real-life drama of being stuck in treacherous conditions with a sinister supernatural element.

Google boss defends Fake News record

“Don’t take this as me being rude, but as a Brit who’s proud of and grown up with our amazing content,” he urged broadcasters to experiment “with different platforms and technologies – I really believe there’s an enormous opportunity for original British content.

“We need some positive opportunities for export right now and the [online] audience is there, it’s growing and it’s going to double in the next five years.”

YouTube Red commissions first UK drama from The Crown creators

YouTube Red has commissioned its debut drama, which will be a sci-fi series from Left Bank Pictures who produced The Crown for Netflix.

They have agreed a deal for Origin, a 10 part sci-fi thriller, created and written by Mika Watkins who has previously written for Sky 1's Stan Lee’s Lucky Man.

At a recent RTS Futures event, the topic of what YouTube meant for the future of television was discussed.