YouTube

Social Media Muscles in on TV

The way we access content is fundamentally changing.  Shorter-form content continues to grow apace and, at the same time, viewing is fragmenting across myriad devices and screens.  Helping drive this change has been the emergence of a new generation of distribution platforms that blend professional video, user generated content and social media.

Digital gurus hail 'most exciting time' for online video

YouTube and Facebook, which between them boast 19 billion daily views worldwide, offer huge online platforms to video content producers but television is also entering the market.

Sky’s new TV service Sky Q includes an online video section, bringing together content from many digital creators, including Barcroft Media, Red Bull Media House and GoPro. And youth brand Vice recently announced that its first European linear TV channel, Viceland, would launch in September.

Beyond YouTube: What are the new online channels?

MCNs are big business, with the leaders among them like Vice, Maker Studios, Red Bull and Fullscreen proving adept at reaching young people, often reaching hundreds of millions of viewers globally.

Having traditionally built their audiences for online stars like PewDiePie and Zoella principally through YouTube, MCNs are increasingly branching out to find new audience on other platforms, including Facebook, as well as more traditional outlets like theatrical-release films and TV channels.

Channel 4 agrees partnership with YouTube

The partnership is part of Channel 4’s mission to become a digital first broadcaster for younger audiences. 

The deal will mean that hundreds of hours of Channel 4 and E4 hit shows such as 8 Out Of 10 CatsSAS: Who Dares Wins and The Dog House will be available on YouTube.            

Channel 4 will also be able to sell its own advertising around the shows, allowing an increase in new revenue streams.

The truth about toxicity in the UK television industry | TOXIC

Youtube Originals presents a Century Films production which how a bullying culture still exists in the UK film and TV industry. Using powerful testimony from real-life survivors working in the industry, actors deliver their stories to create an unsettling and potent look at what continues to happen in some parts of the industry.

Directed by Brian Hill and executive produced by Luke Hyams.

Channel 4 announces new documentary Football’s Coming Out

Credit: Channel 4

The digital documentary will explore why there are still barriers for top footballers being openly LGBTQ+, with many Premier League football players often experiencing numerous challenges if they come out publicly.

Produced by Bullion Productions, the documentary will show the pressure players face if they decide to come out and the reaction that invokes from other players, fans, press, social media and financial donors. 

Archive footage will be used to show what previously happened in historical case studies and how that has changed over time. 

YouTube's CBO Robert Kyncl on the platform's rewards, freedom and censorship

Only a few days before Robert Kyncl sat down for his international keynote session at this year’s RTS Convention, he was on the red carpet in New York for that most exclusive of affairs, the annual Met Gala, presided over militarily by Anna Wintour.

It is testament to the cultural significance of YouTube’s chief business officer that the Vogue supremo invited Kyncl to fill a whole table at the Gala with his own guests, mostly super-­successful content creators on YouTube.

Broadcast Britain: Reshaping Britishness on the global stage

In a stirring session that set that the scene for the 2021 RTS Cambridge Convention, the event’s Chair, Ben McOwen Wilson, encouraged his audience to face up to the biggest challenges to the British television ecosystem. These included the audience shift to digital, the power of the streamers and the problems of how to represent Britishness accurately on the screen, both to UK audiences and overseas.