TikTok

TikTok Famous: How TV Can Leverage TikTok | RTS London

TikTok has become one of the most talked-about social media launches of recent years, but producers and broadcasters are still in the dark on how best to navigate it.

Watch this session about how independent producers, production companies and all major broadcasters across the UK can better understand how to connect with and be discovered by Millennials, Gen Z and beyond on TikTok, driving new kinds of engagement with their content.

What's new on social media this month?

TikTok screen wipes

TikTok has allowed any of us to become social media famous, with the app showcasing new talent surfacing from viral trends that anyone can participate in.

One of the most popular trends is the #WipeItDown challenge, which shows users as their normal selves in a mirror before wiping the mirror down to reveal a surprising alternative image.

Stars such as Jason Derulo and Will Smith have had fun with the trend. The videos are set to the song Wipe It Down by BMW Kenny and Theelboy.

 

TikTok: The bridge between broadcasters and Gen Z?

Twist and Pulse, winners of Britain's Got Talent: The Champions (Credit: ITV/Syco/Thames)

“There’s a huge opportunity for news broadcasters to tell the softer or more interesting stories through the platform – also [stories] that aren’t necessarily so time relevant. That’s basically what our audience want,” said Edward Lindeman, TikTok’s European strategy manager.

“I don't really want to go on the platform and hear about [Brexit] – but I am interested in learning new things and discovering content.”

Tony Hall stresses the importance of the BBC in an age of uncertainty

Tony Hall (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

Earlier, the RTS convention had been told that, as a brand, Netflix today enjoyed the same high levels of public trust as the BBC. As for the TikTok-using, mobile-addicted members of Generation Z, the BBC looked to be completely under the radar.

Now it was the time for Tony Hall, the BBC’s Director-General, to respond. He did so in a wide-ranging, troop-­rallying speech, and argued that, in today’s age of uncertainty, characterised by propaganda and disinformation, the BBC and public service broadcasting were more important than ever.

How TV can compete for the eyes of Gen Z

Rob Chapman, Amber Gill, Caspar Lee, Timothy Armoo and Paul Bojarski (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

Video-sharing platform TikTok was the word on everyone’s lips leaving the second session, “Exploring Gen Z”. Many had not heard of the Chinese-owned social media sensation, but were keen to find out more in order to reach the elusive next generation of viewers. Many market researchers describe Generation Z as those born after 1997.

Defined by session chair Rob Chapman as the generation “for whom 9/11 wasn’t a coming of age event”, Gen Z were instead shaped by the recession of the last decade.