Netflix

Daniel Sloss: Finding comedy in chaos

“I understand my comedy isn’t for everyone, I would never want to be a comedian that appealed to everyone,” admits the Scottish comedian.

Describing his sense of humour as a “darkness”, Sloss often questions offensive comedy in his stand up. “My intention is never to offend…you’re choosing to be offended.”

“I don’t enjoy truly offending anyone, I’m still growing and learning. [But] there is a level of narcissism to being offended by comedy that I am jealous of. You go to a comedian’s show and sit there and think, ‘is this about me?’, that’s all being offended is.”

The Crown: Deconstructing the Coronation

The lavish ten-part Netflix series became another outstanding triumph for writer Peter Morgan and a distinguished team . Critics noted a “startling attention to detail in everything from costumes to sets” and thought it hard to see how it could be better.

The show set out to tell the inside story of the most famous addresses in the world, Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street, and it did just that, exploring the intrigues, love lives and machinations of post-war Britain.

RTS London looks at how to survive in the world of streaming

Over the past year, SVoD services such as Disney+, HBO Max, Peacock (NBCUniversal) and AppleTV+ have come on stream, joining the likes of Netflix and Amazon. 

Alan Wolk, co-founder of media consultancy TV[R]EV, speaking from New Jersey, dubbed the streaming boom a “flixcopalypse”. He said two more – Paramount+ and Discovery+ – were due to launch soon. 

Success is not guaranteed. The short-form streamer Quibi, launched by former Disney exec Jeffrey Katzenberg, collapsed this month after only half a year in business.

Stay Close to be adapted for Netflix from the makers of The Stranger

Cush Jumbo (credit: Netflix)

From the team behind The Stranger and Safe, the series will follow three key characters whose sinister past resurfaces to threaten their everyday lives. Harlan Coben and Danny Brocklehurst (Brassic) will be collaborating alongside Richard Fee and Nicola Shindler to write and create the series.

The series will see Stay Close relocate to an English setting from the States.

TV Picks: 12th October - 19th October

Who Do You Think You Are?

Monday 12th October

BBC One, 9pm


Jodie Whittaker (credit: BBC)

The genealogy documentary series returns, with Jodie Whittaker (Doctor Who) tracing her Yorkshire family tree in this opening episode.

Why Netflix has no rules

No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention by Reed Hastings and Erin Meyer

Candour is a big deal for Netflix co-founder and co-CEO Reed Hastings. Having argued for “increased candour” early on in this eye-popping account of Netlix’s corporate culture, he returns to the idea some 60 pages later in a section called “Pump up candour”. Not content with that, he makes the point again, towards the end of the book, with the exhortation: “Max up candour” (Chapter 8).

Netflix reveals three new cast members for Sex Education series three

(credit: Netflix)

The comedy series follows the sex-obsessed teens of Moordale High School, who seek advice from the unofficial lunchtime sex therapy clinic run by students Otis Milburn (Asa Butterfield) and Maeve Wiley (Emma Mackey).

The second series saw Otis’ best friend Eric get caught in a love triangle between the new French student Rahim (Sami Outalbali) and the headmaster’s bully son Adam Groff (Connor Swindells).

Comfort Classic: Gilmore Girls

On the face of it, a coming-of-age story about a mother and daughter who live in a quirky Connecticut town and speak at the pace of an Aaron Sorkin script doesn’t sound that comforting. But that would be to judge Gilmore Girls, the cult comedy-drama created by Amy Sherman-Palladino too quickly.

Hitting screens in 2000, the show ran for seven seasons, its cross-generational popularity such that it was revived for a four-part Netflix mini-series in 2016, nearly 10 years after the last episode aired.