Netflix

Daniel Sloss: Finding comedy in chaos

“I understand my comedy isn’t for everyone, I would never want to be a comedian that appealed to everyone,” admits the Scottish comedian.

Describing his sense of humour as a “darkness”, Sloss often questions offensive comedy in his stand up. “My intention is never to offend…you’re choosing to be offended.”

“I don’t enjoy truly offending anyone, I’m still growing and learning. [But] there is a level of narcissism to being offended by comedy that I am jealous of. You go to a comedian’s show and sit there and think, ‘is this about me?’, that’s all being offended is.”

The Crown: Deconstructing the Coronation

The lavish ten-part Netflix series became another outstanding triumph for writer Peter Morgan and a distinguished team . Critics noted a “startling attention to detail in everything from costumes to sets” and thought it hard to see how it could be better.

The show set out to tell the inside story of the most famous addresses in the world, Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street, and it did just that, exploring the intrigues, love lives and machinations of post-war Britain.

Comedian Daniel Sloss on nationality, humour and his success

Daniel Sloss (Credit: Jill Furmanovsky)

The thing I absolutely adore about being Scottish is that it doesn’t matter where I gig in Scotland, it’s a homecoming gig. If you’re a scouse comedian, your homecoming gig is in Liverpool. If you’re a Manchester comedian, your homecoming gig is Manchester. If you’re a London comic, you’re fucked because nobody cares.

But the joyous thing about being Scottish is that the Scots are disgustingly supportive of their own. They’re loyal to a fault. It’s just nice because it’s “local boy done good” regardless of where I am in Scotland. I love that.

BBC One and Netflix to co-produce new adaptation of Dracula

The three-part series, written and created by Sherlock’s Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss, will be a reintroduction to literature’s most famous vampire as he plans to cause chaos in Victorian London.

Moffat and Gatiss said, “There have always been stories about great evil. What’s special about Dracula, is that Bram Stoker gave evil its own hero.”

BBC's Director of Content, Charlotte Moore, said of the new project, “Genius duo Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss turn their attentions to Dracula for unmissable event television on BBC One."

A global shift to home-grown

Netflix commissions from Germany, India and Spain

The old saying “Think global, act local” is the new mantra for the Net­flix-led, global tech platforms as they push for ever greater numbers of subscribers. In recent months, Net­flix, Apple and Amazon have all started to open offices, staffed largely by locally grown TV commissioners, in the UK and other non-US markets. Simultaneously, the tech platforms are ramping up local marketing efforts.

Amazon has also jumped into local sports markets, purchasing major live sports rights for the UK, including a Premier League football package and US Open tennis rights.