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Daniel Sloss: Finding comedy in chaos

“I understand my comedy isn’t for everyone, I would never want to be a comedian that appealed to everyone,” admits the Scottish comedian.

Describing his sense of humour as a “darkness”, Sloss often questions offensive comedy in his stand up. “My intention is never to offend…you’re choosing to be offended.”

“I don’t enjoy truly offending anyone, I’m still growing and learning. [But] there is a level of narcissism to being offended by comedy that I am jealous of. You go to a comedian’s show and sit there and think, ‘is this about me?’, that’s all being offended is.”

The Crown: Deconstructing the Coronation

The lavish ten-part Netflix series became another outstanding triumph for writer Peter Morgan and a distinguished team . Critics noted a “startling attention to detail in everything from costumes to sets” and thought it hard to see how it could be better.

The show set out to tell the inside story of the most famous addresses in the world, Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street, and it did just that, exploring the intrigues, love lives and machinations of post-war Britain.

Documentary makers discuss the making of Last Breath with RTS West of England

Sam Rogers, Kate Beetham, Richard da Costa and Alex Parkinson (Credit: Jon Craig)

Four years in the making, the film has been described as “Gravity meets Touching the Void – 100 metres underwater” and tells the story of a commercial diver, Chris Lemons, who is stranded on the seabed with five minutes of oxygen left – but no chance of rescue for more than half an hour.

Writers share the need for drama in good comedy

Back to Life (Credit: BBC)

Comedy, the late, great Tony Hancock would often tell his dinner guests, was simply “frustration, misery, boredom, worry – all the things people suffer from”.

This may go some way to explaining the success of a crop of deceptively simple, single-camera comedy-dramas that have all but replaced our more traditional idea of the sitcom in the television schedules.

How Sally Wainwright brought her heroine to life in Gentleman Jack

Suranne Jones as Anne Lister and Sally Wainwright (Credit: BBC/Lookout Point/Matt Squire)

Some 20 years in the making, Sally’s Wainwright’s new television drama, Gentleman Jack, was originally rejected by every broadcaster she took it to. The story of an openly gay woman who farmed in 19th-century rural Yorkshire was considered a non-starter by TV networks. Starting this month, the topic is getting eight hours of BBC One Sunday-night primetime.

It’s common for writers to describe their latest work as a “passion project” – often industry-accepted shorthand for what they hope is infectious enthusiasm for their new offering.