Netflix

Book review: The Battle for Sky

Agatha Raisin (Ashley Jensen), DCI Bill Wong (Matt McCooey) and Charles Fraith (Jason Merrells) in Sky One's Agatha Raisin (Credit: Sky)

Is it just me, or does this account of the relentless march of Sky feel less like a window into the “future of entertainment” and more the TV equivalent of ancient history?

There are glorious deeds and all-conquering heroes. Step forward Jeremy Darroch, and the man who appointed him CEO of Sky, James Murdoch. Not forgetting the tragic fate of doomed and misguided rivals: hold your heads in shame, Setanta and a host of others.

Netflix to create major production hub at Shepperton Studios

The Crown, Outlaw King, LA's Finest (Credit: Netflix)

The hub will contain 14 sound studios, workshops and office spaces, and is part of Netflix’s long-term commitment to the UK.

Netflix will produce new and existing TV and feature films at the Pinewood owned studios, as they expand their UK network.

In the last year over 25,000 cast, crew and extras have worked on nearly 20 Netflix originals and co-productions across Britain.  

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings announced for RTS Cambridge Convention 2019

Further speakers announced include Karen Blackett OBE, Chair of MediaCom UK; Howard Davine, Executive Vice President, Business Operations, ABC Studios; Sir Lenny Henry, actor, comedian and diversity campaigner; Tim Hincks, Co-CEO of Expectation; Jane Turton, CEO of All3Media; and Linda Yaccarino, Chairman of Advertising and Client Partnerships, NBCUniversal.

The 2019 event, which is set to take place at King’s College in Cambridge from the 18-20th of September, is this year entitled “Content, Consumers, and everything in between”.

Documentary makers discuss the making of Last Breath with RTS West of England

Sam Rogers, Kate Beetham, Richard da Costa and Alex Parkinson (Credit: Jon Craig)

Four years in the making, the film has been described as “Gravity meets Touching the Void – 100 metres underwater” and tells the story of a commercial diver, Chris Lemons, who is stranded on the seabed with five minutes of oxygen left – but no chance of rescue for more than half an hour.

Writers share the need for drama in good comedy

Back to Life (Credit: BBC)

Comedy, the late, great Tony Hancock would often tell his dinner guests, was simply “frustration, misery, boredom, worry – all the things people suffer from”.

This may go some way to explaining the success of a crop of deceptively simple, single-camera comedy-dramas that have all but replaced our more traditional idea of the sitcom in the television schedules.