Netflix

Netflix announce seven new commissions from the Obamas' production company

The range of programmes features a children's series about food around the world, a series shining a light on remarkable people whose deaths were not reported on and a film adaptation of David W. Blight's novel Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom.

The commissions also include documentaries exploring America's disability rights movement, and the story of a Chinese billionaire who faces problems opening a factory in a post-industrial Ohio. 

Our Planet Q&A | Highlights

Following a screening of the Our Planet episode Frozen Worlds, members of the crew, including series producer, Keith Scholey, producer Sophie Lanfear, camera operator Jamie McPherson and assistant producer​ Olly Scholey, spoke to Lynn Barlow about how the episode was made.

The panel shared their experiences working on the nature series and how it was created.

How Netflix's Our Planet was made

The panel (l-r): Jamie McPherson, Sophie Lanfear, Lynn Barlow, Oliver Scholey, Keith Scholey (Credit: RTS/Paul Hampartsoumian)

The sequence – a huge topic on social media - was described by award-winning natural history cinematographer Jamie McPherson as “the most powerful he’s ever shot.”

McPherson was discussing the series, which launched on the streaming service on April 5, at a joint RTS-Wildscreen screening of the Frozen Worlds episode, which featured the walruses.

“The sequence has become a symbol of climate change,” said Keith Scholey, series producer of the eight-part Our Planet, which is narrated by David Attenborough.

Filming begins on Julian Fellowes football drama The English Game

Julian Fellowes (Credit: ITV/Kieron McCarron)

The six-part series will tell the story of the origins of football, and how the people behind the game’s beginnings overcame class divides to make it the world’s most popular sport.

Also starring in the series, which is currently shooting in the UK, are Line of Duty’s Craig Parkinson, James Harkness (The Victim), and Henry Lloyd-Hughes (Indian Summers).

BritBox: Traditional media's answer to US streaming giants

Queen Victoria (Jenna Coleman) in Victoria (Credit: ITV)

It seems only a few short years ago that the BBC and ITV were thought of as the titans of British media. But all of us in the UK’s traditional media solar system are getting smaller and smaller in the Apple, Amazon and Netflix universe.” Thus said Lord Hall, Director-General of the BBC, in March, as he unveiled the corporation’s plans for its new financial year.

“We need to find new ways to adapt to the changing needs of our audiences, and we need to be able to do it in real time to keep pace with our global competitors,” he continued.

Rising star Mae Martin fronts a new comedy for E4

Mae Martin on Unspun With Matt Forde (Credit: Dave/UKTV)

Mae and George (w/t) follows recovering addict Mae (Martin) as she seeks to take control of her life while juggling a relationship with her new girlfriend George and keeping her addictive behaviours in check.

Joe Hampson (Skins) will co-write the series with Martin, and the comedy will be produced by Objective Fiction, whose portfolio includes Game Face, Toast of London and Fresh Meat.

“WHAT A DREAM,” said Mae Martin of the new project. “We cannot wait to make this show with E4, Netflix, and Objective Fiction.”

Production Focus: Who Do You Think You Are

Charles Dance (Credit: BBC)

Graham, who founded the programme’s producer Wall to Wall, came up with the idea for a genealogy series in which famous faces discover the truth about their ancestors – but it took a decade and a half for a commissioner to bite.

“This show is 15 years old this year but this year is also the 30th anniversary of me trying to sell it to the BBC,” he said.

Sex Education to return to Netflix for a second series

The first series follows Otis (Asa Butterfield), an awkward teenager who sets up a sex therapy clinic for his peers with fellow student Maeve (Emma Mackey), while trying to deal with his own sexual and romantic experiences.

Sex Education explores sexuality, love, relationships, identity and the uncomfortable issues that arise when coming to terms with teenage life.

Netflix released the successful figures for the show last month, showing an estimated 40 million people watched the series within 4 weeks of the show's launch.