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Comedian Daniel Sloss on nationality, humour and his success

Daniel Sloss (Credit: Jill Furmanovsky)

The thing I absolutely adore about being Scottish is that it doesn’t matter where I gig in Scotland, it’s a homecoming gig. If you’re a scouse comedian, your homecoming gig is in Liverpool. If you’re a Manchester comedian, your homecoming gig is Manchester. If you’re a London comic, you’re fucked because nobody cares.

But the joyous thing about being Scottish is that the Scots are disgustingly supportive of their own. They’re loyal to a fault. It’s just nice because it’s “local boy done good” regardless of where I am in Scotland. I love that.

BBC One and Netflix to co-produce new adaptation of Dracula

The three-part series, written and created by Sherlock’s Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss, will be a reintroduction to literature’s most famous vampire as he plans to cause chaos in Victorian London.

Moffat and Gatiss said, “There have always been stories about great evil. What’s special about Dracula, is that Bram Stoker gave evil its own hero.”

BBC's Director of Content, Charlotte Moore, said of the new project, “Genius duo Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss turn their attentions to Dracula for unmissable event television on BBC One."

A global shift to home-grown

Netflix commissions from Germany, India and Spain

The old saying “Think global, act local” is the new mantra for the Net­flix-led, global tech platforms as they push for ever greater numbers of subscribers. In recent months, Net­flix, Apple and Amazon have all started to open offices, staffed largely by locally grown TV commissioners, in the UK and other non-US markets. Simultaneously, the tech platforms are ramping up local marketing efforts.

Amazon has also jumped into local sports markets, purchasing major live sports rights for the UK, including a Premier League football package and US Open tennis rights.

Stranger Things than the Elephant Man

The two-part drama for BBC One sees the actor take on the part of Joseph Merrick, who got the unkind moniker due to severe facial and body deformities.

The Elephant Man follow’s Merrick’s extraordinary journey from his working-class beginnings in Leicestershire into the freak shows that made him famous, and on to his time at the London Hospital and his friendship with Dr Frederick Treves.

Treves saw Merrick exhibited in a shop in 1884 and brought him to the London Hospital where he lived until his death in 1890, aged 27.

10 of the best Easter eggs from your favourite TV shows

(Credit: Sky)

Alfred Hitchcock was the first filmmaker to widely use them, making cameo appearances in 39 of his films.

Over the years Easter eggs have become more complex and are almost a trademark for some series such as the Marvel Cinematic Universe. On the small screen they remain prolific in shows where the writers wish to give something back to their audience.

Whether it’s secret messages, inside jokes or obscure references, we’ve got a rundown of ten of the best Easter eggs from British TV.

Netflix boards new futuristic thriller Snowpiercer

(Credit: Pete Morawski)

Seven years after the world has become a frozen wilderness, Snowpiercer centres on the last remnants of humanity, who inhabit a gigantic, perpetually-moving train that circles the planet.

The series is based on the 2013 movie of the same name which starred Hollywood heavyweight Chris Evans and beloved Brits John Hurt and Jamie Bell. Through the train’s hierarchical system of occupancy the series explores the issues of social injustice, class warfare and the politics of survival - the rich ride up front in luxury, while the poor struggle in the desolate tail-end.

Comcast and Disney vie for the Murdoch empire

(Credit: AP)

However it ends, the battle royal for the right to own most of the assets of 21st Century Fox, and all of Sky, reflects deep and significant trends in global media. The resolution (in favour of suitors Disney, Comcast or both) may end up being less important than what the outcome tells us about market dynamics.

This battle is about the response of legacy media to accelerating shifts in consumer behaviour and to the threats posed by the big digital disruptors. In a market where content and distribution are increasingly intermingled and global, size unlocks the prize.