PSBs

PSB at the crossroads

Public service broadcasters have a “fleetingly short space of time” to find a better financing model – and without guaranteed prominence on smart TVs, “PSB is dead, it is over”. These were just two of the stark warnings aired at an RTS panel discussion “Small beer or big deal: Should we still care about PSB?”. 

Government review of public service broadcasting begins

Google the words “public service broadcasting” and you’ll see that the first few links relate to a well-known band that has played at Glastonbury, the Royal Albert Hall and Brixton. Its first album was called Inform – Educate – Entertain. 

Only after that will you find links to Ofcom’s page on public service broadcasting and the Government’s new Public Service Broadcasting Advisory Panel. 

British Broadcasting In Crisis? The PSBs | Steve Hewlett Debate One

Watch the first Steve Hewlett Scholarship event 'British Broadcasting In Crisis? The PSBs' at 5.30pm on Monday 7 December.

Chair John Stapleton, Broadcaster, Former BBC, TV-am, GMTV, ITV, is joined by Mark Damazer, Former BBC Trustee & Controller Radio Four, Greg Dyke, Former Director General, BBC, Former CEO LWT, Claire Enders, Founder Enders Analysis, and Alex Mahon, CEO Channel Four Television.

The impact of lockdown on TV viewing

Celebrity Gogglebox (Credit: Channel 4)

Gifted a captive audience, television has seen its ratings soar during the coronavirus crisis. “People are spending much longer in front of TV sets,” Justin Sampson, CEO of ratings body Barb, told an RTS Zoom event in June. During the first nine weeks of the lockdown, people spent an average of five hours seven minutes in front of the box, a third more than during the same period in 2019.

The economic impact of Covid-19 on the TV industry

Independent producers are the most vulnerable to the economic carnage unleashed on the television sector by corona­virus. That was the consensus of a lively RTS webinar examining the impact of Covd-19 on the UK’s TV and related content industries. However, despite this worrying situation, there was agreement that all the British broadcasters would survive the downturn.

The impact of lockdown on TV viewing

“People are spending much longer in front of TV sets,” Justin Sampson, CEO of ratings body Barb, told an RTS Zoom event in early June.

During the first nine weeks of the lockdown, people spent an average of 5 hours 7 minutes in front of the box, 33% more than during the equivalent period in 2019. These are “the kind of levels you’d normally see at Christmas”, said Sampson.

Viewing of Barb-reported channels – which doesn’t include unidentified viewing: the SVoDs such as Netflix; gaming; YouTube; or overseas satellite channels – has risen by 18%.