RTS event

Industry experts discuss the future of sport on TV

Women’s football is “a success story but it’s only just beginning”, argued Dawn Airey, Chair of the Barclays FA Women's Super League and former Channel 5 Chair. “If you can’t see it, you can’t be it. We want young women to see you can play football at a very high level and make a really good career out of it.”

Free-to-air access, she said, was “absolutely critical”, adding that women’s football has to balance “revenue and reach. We need to drive money into the game but we absolutely want engagement, and to get engagement you need that fee-to-air opportunity.”

Winners, losers and own goals: Live sport in lockdown

At an RTS event in September, some of the leading figures in sports broadcasting recalled the moment when the Covid-19 lockdown brought down the curtain on live sport in the UK.

“It was a moment that had been coming,” said Sky Sports Managing Director Rob Webster, looking back to the March lockdown. “Our Italian colleagues were ahead of us in terms of the virus and their sport. It was only a matter of time.

Camera masterclass with Sara Deane and Mike Robinson

Mike Robinson and Sara Deane (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

Training: Sara Deane was a member of the Children’s Film Unit, before studying at Bournemouth Film School: “I was a clapper loader [second assistant camera] for five years and … [during that time] still shooting shorts because I knew I waned to be a director of photography. I [then studied at] the National Film and Television School and graduated about 10 years ago.”

Sound masterclass with Matt Bacon and Kate Davis

Matt Bacon and Kate Davis (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

Davis received a Bafta nomination this year for her work on the BBC Four documentary Amy Winehouse: Back to Black. Bacon specialises in formatted and entertainment series such as Channel 5 reality show The Bachelor and the BBC’s Masterchef.

Editing masterclass with Emma Lysaght and Matthew Gray

Matthew Gray and Emma Lysaght (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

How to get into editing: Emma Lysaght: “I left school at 16. My father was a film editor so I grew up watching my dad cut film. It was something I’d always wanted to do.

“It was quite a male environment, I was very nervous and very shy. I didn’t get into the cutting room until I was 19. My dad knew of one female editor.

“She needed an assistant so I stepped in and became her assistant. Within the first few months I was cutting news for Channel 4, which was very pressurised but you know exactly what you’ve got to do in those three minutes.