Enders Analysis

Campbell Swinton Lecture: Claire Enders, Enders Analysis

Campbell Swinton was one of Scotland’s pioneers of television technology whose legacy RTS continues to celebrate with a series of high level lectures. The last two speakers were then SNP leader Alex Salmond and BBC Scotland Director Ken MacQuarrie.

Rising above the political fray in Westminster and Holyrood, Claire Enders will explain the purpose and foundations of the PSB system of producing and commissioning news and current affairs, quality entertainment and documentaries, sustained by the BBC, C4, ITV, STV and C5.

Amazon's online drive for audiences

The Grand Tour (Credit: Amazon)

It’s rare for Yorkshire town Whitby to make the national press – unless, of course, there’s been a flood – but wherever Jeremy Clarkson goes, the world follows. Amazon’s impending launch of The Grand Tour is one of the most globally anticipated series of all time.

Jay Marine, vice-president of Amazon Prime Video Europe, says: “It is a huge TV moment, not only for us but for UK TV generally.”

Claire Enders defends public service broadcasting in Campbell Swinton Lecture

Claire Enders offered a robust defence of public service broadcasting in delivering the RTS Scotland Campbell Swinton Lecture to a sold-out lecture room at BBC Scotland in November.

The founder and owner of media researcher firm Enders Analysis backed the Scottish Government’s media policy. “Here, the administration believes that public service broadcasting is a fundamental good for all and believes in the core market interventions – the BBC, Channel 4 – that have been developed over almost a century,” she said.

Philippe Dauman: The king in waiting

Philippe Dauman

Philippe Dauman, Chief Executive of Viacom, the media empire created by nonagenarian Sumner Redstone, has been called many things in his long Viacom career.

One is "dauphin", marking both his succession potential and the fact that he is French-born. Although he has lived almost all of his life in the US, Dauman is a fluent French speaker.

He is "an iron fist in a velvet glove" according to Sir Martin Sorrell, Chief Executive of WPP. The New York Times summed him up as "The man who would be Redstone".