The One Show

The One Show: RTS Futures event

Audience researcher Emmey Little, who landed a job at the BBC One show after applying for a runner position posted on the Facebook group “People looking for TV work”, fielded questions from RTS Futures members before they joined the audience for the live show.

“There’s no shortcut,” she explained, and advised those with no TV experience to show their transferable skills from jobs in customer service or student ventures such as TV societies at university.

The One Show

The One Show is opening its doors to RTS Futures, where you are invited to watch a live episode at BBC Studios, with Martine McCutcheon on the couch and musical guest Paloma Faith set to perform!

Before the show, RTS Futures attendees will be invited to an exclusive Q&A with Emmey Little, who knows everything there is to know about The One Show, having worked her way up the team from assistant to the executive producer to Audience Researcher. 

Does TV's top talent have too much power?

Jeremy Clarkson

Since Jeremy Clarkson punched his Top Gear producer, Oisin Tymon, during a row over the lack of a hot meal, the problems of managing talent have been centre stage.

Former BBC Controller of Entertainment Commissioning Jane Lush said that the fracas distilled some of the key questions that executives and programme-makers face: “How power­ful is talent, where do you draw the line on bad behaviour and is top talent really irreplaceable?”

Behind the Scenes: The One Show

In this episode, as part of our Behind the Scenes series, we take a look at the production process at The One Show. Known for its topical magazine style and famous guests, The One Show is hosted by Alex Jones and former Blue Peter star Matt Baker. The team bring daily live entertainment to our screens, so join us to see how they bring the show to life. 

 

How to be the best researcher

Without competent researchers, TV would be riddled with half-truths and even outright lies, the butt of viewers’ derision and the recipient of libel lawyers’ writs.

Helpfully, the latest RTS Futures event, "How to be the best... researcher", explained how the job should be done.

"Research is the life blood of the TV industry. Without research, we’d have no Big Brother, Gogglebox or Panorama," argued broadcaster and writer Rick Edwards, who chaired the June event.

Tips in 60 seconds... How to be a factual researcher

Researchers help form the backbone of any production. Along with producers, they are the ones finding case studies, booking contributors, scouting locations and most importantly, researching facts.

Ayo has been a BBC researcher for two years. Before his current role as shooting researcher on Building Cars Live for BBC Two, Ayo worked as a researcher for Red Bee Media and as a runner on The One Show. In this video he talks about the skills needed to be a good researcher and how to progress to the role from being a runner.