Channel 4 News

Dorothy Byrne: Wickedness that’s been going on for decades is still wickedness, and we should expose it

Dorothy Byrne (Credit: Channel 4)

At her very first World in Action meeting as a young researcher, Dorothy Byrne experienced a feeling she couldn’t quite put her finger on. Until she realised that it was “the feeling I got if I accidentally wandered into the gents’ toilets – I shouldn’t be here!”

Being a rare woman in a man’s world in the early 1980s didn’t deter her, however, and Byrne has now worked in investigative broadcast journalism for nigh on four decades.

RTS Futures uncover the secrets of investigative journalism

Ed Howker, Ben Zand, Livvy Haydock, Sirin Kale and David Henshaw (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

“When you’re young, you’re going to do your best work – you’re fearless and you take risks that you wouldn’t take when you’re older,” said David Henshaw, a former BBC reporter and producer who has run his own indie, Hardcash Productions, for almost three decades.

"It’s always going to be risky and you only get the really good stuff by taking risks"

Henshaw was speaking at an RTS Futures event on investigative journalism in London. The multi-award-wining film-maker received an RTS Fellowship in 2009.

Gary Gibbon’s TV Diary

Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament

Parliament is “a sick house” right now. That’s not a comment on the politics of the place but a diagnosis by Philippa Whitford MP, the Commons’ most senior medical figure. The SNP politician has a long career as a cancer surgeon behind her, and MPs aware of her medical background have been bending her ear to tell her of their anxiety issues.

Whitford says sleepless nights and persistent stress are rampant and she’s had MPs telling her of their inability to process information as a result.

Meet...Anja Popp

Channel 4 News journalist Anja Popp talks about her career in journalism and the experiences she's had behind and in front of the camera.

Having progressed quickly through the ranks at Channel 4 News, working as an intern, Washington gofer, guest-booker, London planner, producer and now reporter, Anja has established herself as a journalist on the rise.

Channel 4 News announces new Facebook Watch show

(Credit: Channel 4)

Channel 4 News has announced a partnership with Facebook to produce a new weekly news show.

Uncovered is an in-depth news and analysis programme that will see Channel 4 News correspondents shedding light on unreported stories in 10-minute episodes.

The series will focus on one major international issue each week and is due to premier in the new year.

It is the latest commission for Facebook’s funded news shows initiative to tackle fake news and will be available on Facebook Watch.

How to become a news camera operator

(Image courtesy of Dai Baker)

Channel 4 News cameraman Dai Baker has travelled around the world, including a ten-year stint at the broadcaster’s Washington bureau.  

He’s now based in Wales where, alongside a reporter and producer, he films and edits news packages from Wales and the West Country - although he’s always on standby to go further afield, covering the inauguration of Donald Trump in the USA and the political protests in Barcelona (see video below). 

Channel 4 News' Jon Snow hits out at social media giant Facebook

The Channel 4 News anchor called for journalists and their recruiters to leave their bubble in order to widen the awareness and understanding of people outside the media elite.

Snow said that the recent Grenfell Tower tragedy had exposed a shameful lack in awareness of issues facing those on lower incomes.

In a moving speech, Snow spoke of the guilt he felt when confronted by the survivors of the Grenfell disaster who asked broadcasters “where were you? Why didn’t you come here before?”

Waad al-Kateab’s TV diary

I have just arrived in London from Turkey, where my family is now living after the fall of our beloved city, Aleppo. I am travelling with my husband, Hamza, and our first stop from Heathrow airport is the Channel 4 News office.

I am feeling excited but also apprehensive. One of the first people I meet in the newsroom is the presenter Jon Snow. When we are introduced, he bursts into tears. I feel emotional, too. These are the people who have made it possible to show the world my footage, the real stories and horrors of the people of Syria.