writing

TV writers give a masterclass in scriptwriting for RTS Scotland

April Chamberlain, Lorna Martin and Stuart Hepburn (Credit: Ben Gallacher)

Lorna Martin, who won the inaugural Writers Award at the RTS Scotland Awards in June, encouraged would-be writers in the audience to put pen to paper: “People want your story. There’s so many production companies and they want content.”

Martin – who adapted her best-selling book, Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, for UKTV channel W and RTÉ2 (Women on the Verge) – continued: “Look for the type of production company whose shows resonate with you or [make] shows you like – I think that’s crucial.”

She added: “And send them a nice email.”

Let's Talk - Writing For TV

In June at this year's RTS Scotland Awards , we presented the inaugural Writer's Award to Lorna Martin for her newly scripted TV comedy, "Women on the Verge". As a society who celebrates the craft within our industry, we are delighted to bring you an evening with three successful and established TV writers.

Mum writer Stefan Golaszewski: Loss of self seems to be an essential component of becoming a mother

Stefan Golaszewski (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

If anyone ever doubted that comedy and tragedy go hand in hand, look no further than the much-garlanded BBC Two sitcom, Mum, starring Lesley Manville as Cathy, a late-­middle-aged mother coming to terms with the death of her husband.

Making a TV audience laugh is among the most difficult skills for any screenwriter to learn, but to make them laugh one minute and almost cry a few moments later is the hallmark of a very special talent.

Is this The End of the F***ing World?

“I think everyone can relate to that [feeling]” comments the 34-year-old. “When you’re 16 and you think everything’s conspiring against you.”

The award-winning drama garnered a cult following almost overnight earlier this year when it debuted on Channel 4 and shortly followed globally on Netflix.

Jed Mercurio's advice for screenwriters

Line of Duty (Credit: BBC)

Now's a great time to get into writing for TV. There have never been more opportunities for scripted programming. To stand out from the crowd, an idea should seem original and distinctive.

While the breadth of programming has increased, the traditional formats have remained dominant. Your writing should fit the standard models for a mini-series, a serial or an episodic series; 30 minutes for comedy, 60 minutes for drama.

Red Planet Pictures announces Writer's Room programme

Tony Jordan (Credit: Red Planet Pictures)

Red Planet has invited four rising screenwriters to join the programme, where they will be paired with an established showrunner to develop an original idea from the its inception to production.

The first stage of the scheme will see the writers develop a contemporary crime thriller. The eight-part series, set in London, will be developed from start to finish by the Writers’ Room and be led by Red Planet CEO Tony Jordan.

Watch industry experts discuss their craft at the RTS Student Masterclasses

Morgan Matthews (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

Students were given the opportunity to listen industry experts about their craft.

From cameraman Steve Robinson describing how to portray personal moments on camera to editor of BBC One's The Missing explaining how a show comes together in the cutting room, the two-day masterclasses provided advice and insight into the television industry.