Russell T Davies

Omari Douglas on It’s A Sin, working with Russell T Davies and discovering Britain’s historic queer trailblazers

Omari Douglas (credit: Phil Sharp)

At drama school, Douglas and his friends would make a big event of watching Cucumber, Russell T Davies’ exploration of 21st cenutry gay life. Now, the theatre actor has landed his first ever TV role as one of the lead characters in Davies’ explosive new drama, It’s A Sin, and he couldn’t be more excited.

“It’s Russell T Davies, he has such an iconic body of work,” he effuses. “And, of course, we're representing a very important community at a very important time. So, it's a huge, huge honour to have been a part of it.”

Channel 4 releases first teaser for It’s a Sin

Russell T Davies with the cast of It's a Sin (credit: Channel 4)

Written by Russell T Davies (A Very English Scandal), the series follows a group of queer men in 1980s London set against the backdrop of the AIDS crisis.

Olly Alexander plays 18-year-old Ritchie Tozer, a youngster beginning a new life in London. There he meets the unassuming Colin (Callum Scott Howells) and party boy Roscoe (Omari Douglas) and the trio form a close friendship.

Russell T Davies warns of ‘great threat’ to TV

The writer was talking at an RTS North West online Q&A in late April. He recalled the 2008 recession, when friends at ITV told him, “‘We don’t know if we can show this episode of The Bill tonight,’ [because] they were so short of advertisers and money.

“This recession is going to be even bigger and it’s going to affect the commercial channels hugely… and [the streamers] will start cutting back as well.

“We’ve got a Government that is morally and profoundly opposed to the BBC. Please don’t think they’ll change their minds about the BBC in this crisis.”

Russell T Davies: An audience with a TV revolutionary

Russell T Davies with Gethin Jones (right) and Judith Winnan (left), who presented him with his RTS Fellowship (Credit: Aaron Lowe Photography)

In just 20 years, Russell T Davies has left an indelible mark on British television. From Queer as Folk, via Doctor Who, to this year’s dystopian chiller Years and Years, Davies has written unforgettable drama. His work – like the writer in person – is opinionated and loud, but also warm and human.

RTS North West celebrate on and off-screen talent at 2019 awards

The crew and cast of Years and Years (Credit: Andrew F Photography)

The BBC One series, made by the Red Production Company, bagged three awards at the ceremony, which was held at the Hilton Deansgate in Manchester. Years and Years was named Best Drama, while the acting gongs went to Rory Kinnear and Jessica Hynes.

Granada Reports also picked up three awards on the night. The ITV News programme won the Best Regional News Programme award for its investigation into the North West’s high suicide rate and the prize for Best Digital Content. Sports correspondent Chris Hall was named Best Regional News Journalist.

Russell T Davies celebrates his TV career with RTS Wales

Russell T Davies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama (Credit: Aaron Lowe Photography)

RTS Cymru Wales Chair Judith Winnan made the award at the end of a sold-out event at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama to mark the RTS Centre’s 60th anniversary.

The multi-award-winning writer and regenerator of Doctor Who had been discussing his career with Gethin Jones. The TV presenter met Davies when he was working on Blue Peter 15 years ago – and went on to appear in Doctor Who, albeit as a Dalek and Cyberman.

In Conversation with Russell T Davies: Sold Out!

The Royal Television Society commemorates its 60th year in Wales with an evening dedicated to Swansea-born Russell T Davies on Monday 28 October at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama.

Russell is responsible for such groundbreaking shows such as Queer As Folk and the multi award-winning A Very English Scandal, starring Hugh Grant and Ben Whishaw.

His 2019 drama series Years And Years, set in a near-future where British society teeters on the edge of collapse and starring Emma Thompson and Anne Reid, has received global critical acclaim.

Why Trump's win inspired Russell T Davies to write Years and Years

On the eve of the 2016 US presidential election, when Donald Trump was getting his first inkling that he would be elected to the world’s highest political office, Russell T Davies was texting the controller of BBC drama about an idea they had long been discussing. “I wrote to Piers Wenger and said, ‘If he wins tomor­row, it’s time I write this show now’ – and he said yes,” recalls Davies.