Drama

In conversation with Jeff Pope

Starring Martin Freeman and Imelda Staunton, A Confession, is based on the true story of Detective Superintendent Steve Fulcher, who breached police protocol to catch a killer, costing him his career.

As the writer of dramas including Mrs BiggsLittle Boy Blue and Cilla, Jeff will also discuss highlights from his award-winning career. Filled with clips and stories, this promises to be an evening not to be missed.

Anatomy of a Hit: Line of Duty

The critically acclaimed second series hit our screens in 2014 and realising they had a hit on their hands, the BBC commissioned two more that year. Having become the most popular drama series broadcast on BBC Two in the multi-channel era, Line of Duty made the jump to BBC One.

 With filming for series five underway and fans eagerly anticipating the return of the AC-12 team in 2019, Line of Duty is widely recognised as the decade’s best British drama series.

First images released of Jenna Coleman in The Serpent

Jenna Coleman as Marie-Andrée Leclerc and Tahir Rahim as Charles Sobhraj (credit: BBC)

The eight-part series stars Tahar Rahim (A Prophet) as murderer Charles Sobhraj alongside Jenna Coleman (Victoria) as his partner Marie-Andrée Leclerc.

Inspired by true events, The Serpent follows the capture of Sobhraj (Rahim), a man who became Interpol’s most wanted man in the seventies. As the lead suspect in numerous unsolved murders of Western tourists across India, Thailand and Nepal, Sobhraj continually eluded imprisonment despite arrest warrants in three different continents.

Joanna Lumley and Nigel Havers join the cast of new ITV drama Finding Alice

Keeley Hawes (Credit: ITV)

The six-part drama, Finding Alice, created by Roger Goldby (The Durrells), Keeley Hawes (Bodyguard) and Simon Nye (Men Behaving Badly), starts production this week.

Hawes plays Alice, whose life is turned upside down with the sudden death of her husband, Harry (Jason Merrells) which leads to a trail of secrets, debt, suspicion and criminality.

Alice’s parents Sarah and Roger will be played by Joanna Lumley (Absolutely Fabulous) and Nigel Havers (Benidorm).

Sky and HBO announce new drama Landscapers starring Olivia Colman

(credit: Sky)

The four-part series will be the latest project from Sister shared by the broadcasters following the success of Chernobyl.

Landscapers will follow the true crime story of the seemingly innocuous couple Susan (Colman) and Christopher Edwards, who came to murder Susan’s parents and bury them in their garden in Mansfield, where they remained undiscovered for a decade.

Directed by Academy Award winner Alexander Payne (The Descendants) and written by Ed Sinclair, the black comedy series offers a playful portrayal of this unique murder case.

Killing Eve renewed for a fourth series

The second series finale sees Villanelle (Jodie Comer) and Eve (Sandra Oh) go on the run together after Carolyn’s (Fiona Shaw) betrayal. However, when Eve discovers that Villanelle had a gun on her and could have prevented Eve from killing Raymond, she decides to walk away.

The shock final scenes sees assassin Villanelle shoot Eve and leave her for dead in Rome.

Sky announces new studio at Elstree

The new studio is planned to house the production of multiple TV shows and films simultaneously and will be located in Elstree, close to the home of Star Wars and Strictly Come Dancing, Elstree Studios.

Backed by Sky’s recent new owner Comcast, the new studio will be developed in partnership with sister-company NBCUniversal and Legal & General.

First glimpse of Lennie James in Save Me Too

Nelly Rowe (Lennie James) (Credit: Sky/Sky Studios/World Productions)

Save Me Too follows the return of estranged father Nelly (Lennie James), seventeen months after his unsuccessful search for his missing daughter Jody.

Challenged to re-evaluate his life decisions, Nelly’s search forced him to take dangerous risks that dragged him into a dark underworld that trafficks kidnapped youngsters including Jody.

Russell T Davies: An audience with a TV revolutionary

Russell T Davies with Gethin Jones (right) and Judith Winnan (left), who presented him with his RTS Fellowship (Credit: Aaron Lowe Photography)

In just 20 years, Russell T Davies has left an indelible mark on British television. From Queer as Folk, via Doctor Who, to this year’s dystopian chiller Years and Years, Davies has written unforgettable drama. His work – like the writer in person – is opinionated and loud, but also warm and human.