BBC Three

Size Matters: A provocative look at short-form content (RTS FUTURES)

From YouTube to Channel 4, Snapchat to BBC Three, the revolution is happening and you can be a part of it!

RTS Futures is hosting a unique event where we invite you to learn from some of the greatest short-form pioneers.

An esteemed panel of industry leaders is ready to share their advice, trends and insights. Topics include how to create a career online, what short videos gets commissioned and what the future holds for emerging creative talent.

Channel 4 wins big at the Grierson Awards

Grayson Perry at the Grierson Awards

Channel 4 swept the boards at last night’s Grierson Awards, which celebrate documentaries that have made a significant contribution to the form.

RTS award-winner Grayson Perry was crowned Documentary Presenter of the Year for his Channel 4 series Who Are You? with Grierson Trust chairman Lorraine Heggessey calling Perry a national treasure who “is an interviewer who gets under the skin of his subjects and an artist who captures their essence.”

New BBC Three sitcom Starstruck announced

Rose Matafeo (Credit: BBC)

Starstruck follows Rose (Matafeo), a twenty-something millennial living in London struggling to juggle two dead-end jobs to make ends meet.

An awkward morning-after-the-night-before is made even worse when she discovers she has accidentally slept with a film star, setting in motion a series of complications she could never have imagined.

Matafeo is a comedian and actress who won the Best Comedy Show at the Edinburgh Comedy Awards 2018 for her solo show, Horndog

Commissioners explain how to get an idea on TV

Anna Cronin (Chair), Damian Kavanagh, Catherine Lynch and Kate Stannard (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

“If you are defensive and precious about your idea, and you won’t let it evolve, whether that’s in your brainstorm or when you’re pitching to the commissioner, it’s just never going to go anywhere,” explained Catherine Lynch, creative director at Initial TV, which makes ITV gameshow Tenable

Initial’s head of development Kate Stannard agreed: “What you end up seeing on telly is often quite different to the thing you first said in the room.”

New game show Hush Money is the ultimate friendship test

Credit: BBC

The series – set to air on BBC Three later this year – will see teams of friends faced with four individual chambers, each containing a series of challenges.

Starting the game with £5,000 in prize money, the team must endure a series of shocks, surprises and scares as they complete the various challenges.

Each chamber will elicit a reaction from the team, from blood curdling screams, to shouts of joy, but each time one of the group screams, the prize money drops.

Writers share the need for drama in good comedy

Back to Life (Credit: BBC)

Comedy, the late, great Tony Hancock would often tell his dinner guests, was simply “frustration, misery, boredom, worry – all the things people suffer from”.

This may go some way to explaining the success of a crop of deceptively simple, single-camera comedy-dramas that have all but replaced our more traditional idea of the sitcom in the television schedules.

Filming starts on Sally Rooney’s Normal People

Sally Rooney (Credit BBC)

Oscar-nominated Lenny Abrahamson (Room, Frank) and Bafta-winner Hettie MacDonald (Howard’s End) are on board to direct the 12-part BBC Three drama, with filming due to take place in Dublin, Sligo and Italy.

The modern love story has been adapted for the screen by Sally Rooney, alongside writers Alice Birch and Mark O’Rowe.

Normal People follows the tender but complex relationship of popular and easy-going Connell and lonely and intimidating Marianne.

Mum writer Stefan Golaszewski: Loss of self seems to be an essential component of becoming a mother

Stefan Golaszewski (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

If anyone ever doubted that comedy and tragedy go hand in hand, look no further than the much-garlanded BBC Two sitcom, Mum, starring Lesley Manville as Cathy, a late-­middle-aged mother coming to terms with the death of her husband.

Making a TV audience laugh is among the most difficult skills for any screenwriter to learn, but to make them laugh one minute and almost cry a few moments later is the hallmark of a very special talent.

Industry experts share the secrets to get comedy on TV

Tom Davis, James de Frond, Lara Singer and Andrew Brereton (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

A packed RTS Futures event, “Pitching script to screen”, offered aspiring writers and producers tips on how they should hone and sell their ideas to commissioners.

Leading the panel of seasoned comedy and entertainment practitioners was Tom Davis, the star of the RTS and Bafta award-winning BBC Three sitcom Murder in Successville.