Comedy

Samson Kayo: Chewing Gum inspired me to tell my own story

Joshua (Samson Kayo) and Ricky (Theo Barklem-Biggs) in Sliced (Credit: UKTV)

Over the past few years, UKTV channel Dave has notched up an impressive series of hits with home-grown comedies such as Taskmaster and Dave Gorman: Modern Life is Goodish.

Now it has high hopes for Sliced, a sitcom based on Samson Kayo’s crazy experiences as a South London pizza delivery driver, launched this month.

Gavin & Stacey to return for a one-off BBC Christmas special

Gavin and Stacey cast (Credit: BBC)

Written and created by Ruth Jones and James Corden, who also star in the series, the hit sitcom will be produced by Fulwell 73, Tidy Productions and Baby Cow Productions.

Gavin & Stacey originally aired on the BBC from 2007 to 2010 for three series, plus a Christmas special in 2008.

The show followed Gavin (Matthew Horne), an ordinary boy from Essex, and Stacey (Joanna Page), an ordinary girl from Barry, who spoke to each other every day on the phone at work.

Mum writer Stefan Golaszewski: Loss of self seems to be an essential component of becoming a mother

Stefan Golaszewski (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

If anyone ever doubted that comedy and tragedy go hand in hand, look no further than the much-garlanded BBC Two sitcom, Mum, starring Lesley Manville as Cathy, a late-­middle-aged mother coming to terms with the death of her husband.

Making a TV audience laugh is among the most difficult skills for any screenwriter to learn, but to make them laugh one minute and almost cry a few moments later is the hallmark of a very special talent.

From acting to writing: Toby Jones talks Don't Forget the Driver

Barry Green (Toby Jones) in Don't Forget the Driver (Credit: BBC Two)

You wait years for a TV comedy centred on the disruption caused by the sudden arrival of a foreign migrant in a settled world and, suddenly, two come along at once.

This spring, Channel 4 has showcased Home, Rufus Jones’s well-­received show in which his uptight character, Peter, and partner return from holiday to find a Syrian man called Sami (Youssef Kerkour) living in the boot of the family car.

Industry experts share the secrets to get comedy on TV

Tom Davis, James de Frond, Lara Singer and Andrew Brereton (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

A packed RTS Futures event, “Pitching script to screen”, offered aspiring writers and producers tips on how they should hone and sell their ideas to commissioners.

Leading the panel of seasoned comedy and entertainment practitioners was Tom Davis, the star of the RTS and Bafta award-winning BBC Three sitcom Murder in Successville.

Ticket to timetravel: How Timewasters became a comedy hit

Samson Kayo (Horace), Kadiff Kirwan (Jason), Daniel Lawrence Taylor (Nick) and Adelayo Adedayo (Lauren) in Timewasters (Credit: ITV)

Timewasters has charmed critics and attracted healthy audiences with its mix of jazz, time travel and good jokes. Notably, it also has an all-black leading cast but, according to its creator, Daniel Lawrence Taylor, it is, “first and foremost”, a comedy.

Rising star Mae Martin fronts a new comedy for E4

Mae Martin on Unspun With Matt Forde (Credit: Dave/UKTV)

Mae and George (w/t) follows recovering addict Mae (Martin) as she seeks to take control of her life while juggling a relationship with her new girlfriend George and keeping her addictive behaviours in check.

Joe Hampson (Skins) will co-write the series with Martin, and the comedy will be produced by Objective Fiction, whose portfolio includes Game Face, Toast of London and Fresh Meat.

“WHAT A DREAM,” said Mae Martin of the new project. “We cannot wait to make this show with E4, Netflix, and Objective Fiction.”

Lisa McGee discusses the success of Derry Girls and female-led comedies

Derry Girls Mural (Credit: Channel 4)

Peek around the corner of Badgers Bar in Derry and you’ll see the larger-than-life faces of Erin, Clare, Michelle, Orla and James plastered over the wall. As far as signs of a show’s success go, they don’t get much bigger than a five-metre-high mural.

From the moment the profane and brilliant Derry Girls burst on to our screens last year in a haze of teenage escapades, nostalgic music and 1990s artefacts – such as pastel printed wallpaper, Baby-G watches and armed soldiers on the streets – it captivated its audience.