Rosie Jones

The Last Leg returns for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

Credit: Channel 4

After the pandemic delayed the Tokyo Paralympic Games for a year, Adam Hills, Alex Brooker and Josh Widdicombe will present The Last Leg of Tokyo live every day at 10pm on Channel 4.

The trio will report from the BT Studios in the heart of the London Olympic Village in Stratford, discussing the biggest news and sporting stories of the day. 

Comedian Rosie Jones, who originally started her TV career as a researcher for The Last Leg during the 2016 Paralympic Games, will act as a roving reporter. 

Rosie Jones and Deborah Williams question where the disabled people are in TV

If you want some light reading, please do not dip into the Creative Diversity Network’s recent report, “Diamond: The Fourth Cut”. The statistics are grim, particularly when it comes to disability. According to the report, the UK TV industry has “urgent” work to do on disability representation, both on- and off-screen. This is an understatement of monumental proportions.

Channel 4 commissions new travelogue series with Rosie Jones

Exploring the UK in all its eccentric glory, Jones will set out to prove the power of minority and a good sense of humour over a big budget when it comes to travel.

Semi-scripted, the series begins with Jones having to abandon her global, luxurious travel plans, before convincing Channel 4 to adapt conceptually to Covid-19 and its constraints.

Instead, each episode a celebrity guest will join Jones in a different location within the UK, sniffing out adventures in both the city and the country.

Rosie Jones’s TV diary

Rosie Jones on stage at the Funny Women Awards 2016 (Credit: Funny Women Ltd.)

This week, like most weeks, has been a little busy. And when I say, “a little busy”, I mean rushed-off-my-feet-no-time-to-sleep busy. I mean, is sleep really necessary?

I’m thinking, no, not really. Apart from the Bags for Life under my eyes, I am really happy, and every morning I wake up with a smile on my face. I still can’t believe that I get paid to make people laugh. I am living the dream.

Where have all the disabled people gone?

Adam Hills, Rosie Jones and Shannon Murray (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

That was the sobering conclusion from an RTS early evening event, Where Have All the Disabled People Gone?

Paradoxically the discussion was full of laughter and sly wit, not least from chair, the journalist and presenter Ade Adepitan.     

A panel of disabled men and women who work in TV and media told the audience of their experiences trying to make a living in TV.