David Mitchell

David Mitchell to star in BBC Shakespeare comedy

BBC Radio 4, David Mitchell, Comedy, Graeme Garden

BBC Two has commissioned a new sitcom from writer and comedian Ben Elton about William Shakespeare's early career.  

Upstart Crow is due to be broadcast on BBC Two in 2016 as part of the BBC’s Shakespeare Festival, marking 400 years since Shakespeare's death.

The series follows a young Will Shakespeare, played by actor and comedian David Mitchell, as he begins his extraordinary career, finding inspiration from the most unlikely of sources.

This week's best on demand TV

Catastrophe (Credit: Channel 4)

1. Catastrophe

Available on All4

Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney's acerbic comedy about a couple who get pregnant after a one-week-stand was one of this year's funniest new sitcoms. The second series has just started on Channel 4, and it's just as sharp, vulgar, and uproariously funny as the first. In the opening two episodes, the pair are adjusting to family life - and try to rekindle their romance with an ill-fated minibreak to Paris.

 

Peep Show final series to air in November

Robert Webb and David Mitchell (Credit: Channel 4)

Channel 4 has announced that the ninth and final season of Peep Show will begin on Wednesday 11 November at 10pm.

The critically-acclaimed comedy is a standout favourite, and stars David Mitchell and Robert Webb as Croydon flatmates Mark and Jez. It has won a spate of awards, including Baftas and a Royal Television Society Award for writers Jesse Armstrong and Sam Bain.

Paxman and Stewart on TV's election coverage

Jeremy Paxman and Alastair Stewart

Alastair Stewart may have hosted British television’s first political leaders’ debate in April 2010 but, more often than not, it was Jeremy Paxman who had the last word at a rumbustious RTS Legends lunch in May.

Steve Hewlett was the ringmaster at this highly entertaining event, which sought to bring an insider’s perspective to the recent general election.

For much of the time, the two TV anchor men agreed to disagree. Paxman was as cynical as Stewart was enthusiastic. Maybe he’d recently attended a positive-thinking course.