Steve Hewlett

Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture 2017

Steve Hewlett, the distinguished media commentator and programme maker, passed away on 20 February this year after a very public battle with cancer.  He lived his last days through memorable encounters with Eddie Mair on PM and BBC Radio Four and his cancer diary in the Observer.

His good friend Nick Robinson, BBC Radio Four Today presenter and former Political Editor for the BBC, will give the inaugural Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture on 28 September at the University of Westminster.

British Broadcasting In Crisis? The Commercial Channels & the rise of VOD | Steve Hewlett Debate Two

Watch the second Steve Hewlett Scholarship event 'British Broadcasting In Crisis? The Commercial Channels & the rise of VOD' at 5.30pm on Tuesday 8 December.

Chair John Stapleton, Broadcaster, Former BBC, TV-am, GMTV, ITV, is joined by Sir Peter Bazalgette, Executive Chairman ITV, Former Independent and BBC producer, Claire Enders, Founder, Enders Analysis, Janine Gibson, Assistant Editor & Editor Special Projects, The Financial Times, and Mark Thompson, Former Director General, BBC, Former CEO The New York Times. Thanks given by Tim Davie, Director General, BBC.

British Broadcasting In Crisis? The PSBs | Steve Hewlett Debate One

Watch the first Steve Hewlett Scholarship event 'British Broadcasting In Crisis? The PSBs' at 5.30pm on Monday 7 December.

Chair John Stapleton, Broadcaster, Former BBC, TV-am, GMTV, ITV, is joined by Mark Damazer, Former BBC Trustee & Controller Radio Four, Greg Dyke, Former Director General, BBC, Former CEO LWT, Claire Enders, Founder Enders Analysis, and Alex Mahon, CEO Channel Four Television.

RTS announces 2020 undergraduate bursary scholars

The prestigious scheme aims to widen participation in, and access to, the media industry by supporting talented students from lower income backgrounds who are pursuing careers in television. STV, All3 Media and the Steve Hewlett Memorial Fund also provide funds and support for the TV Production/Journalism bursaries.

Mark Thompson discusses the risks facing the UK media landscape at the Steve Hewlett Lecture

Mark Thompson (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

The UK is facing “a total loss of cultural sovereignty”, which risks leaving the country culturally impoverished unless action is taken to stop US giants such as Netflix from dominating the media landscape.

This was the frank message from Mark Thompson, the former Director-General of the BBC who, for seven years since 2012, has been engaged in a wholesale transformation of The New York Times from a print company into a digital-based global news operation with 5 million subscribers.

Mark Thompson warns government policies endanger the BBC at the Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture

Mark Thompson, President and CEO of The New York Times Company (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

Giving the third Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture at London’s Westminster University, he accused policy makers of largely concentrating “on tightening the funding pressure and other constraints on the BBC further” including “the disastrous withdrawal of funding free licence fees for the over 75’s” agreed in the 2016 Charter now coming into full effect.  

Charlotte Moore's Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture | Full Video

BBC Director of Content, Charlotte Moore, delivers the Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture 2018, a joint initiative by the RTS and the Media Society.

Moore talked of the threat to British content for British audiences with the rise in popularity of US streaming services like Netflix and Amazon, and spoke of the key ways the BBC will aim to promote content bespoke to Britain in the future.

To donate to the Steve Hewlett Memorial Fund, please visit www.rts.org.uk/SteveHewlettFund.

BBC's Charlotte Moore highlights the importance of British TV at the Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture

Delivering the Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture, Moore echoed recent remarks made by BBC Director General, Tony Hall, in which he called for more funding for the BBC or investment in U.K. programmes would fall still further.

“In this new, US-dominated media environment, we run the risk of seeing fewer and fewer distinctively British stories.

“In a world of incredible, unprecedented choice, the irony is that British audiences may find it harder and harder to choose the stories that matter to them most,” said Moore.