RTS events

Celebrating 10 Years of Call the Midwife

The RTS celebrates 10 years of Call the Midwife with series writer Heidi Thomas and cast members Helen George, Leonie Elliott and Jenny Agutter.

As the iconic show heads into 1966 for the upcoming 10th series, the panel discuss what lies ahead for the next series and look back at some of the memorable storylines and the big historical events that impacted the lives of the midwives and nuns at Nonnatus House over the past nine series.

The New News: One Year On | RTS Isle of Man

In May 2020, RTS Isle of Man hosted its first online event, examining how news from the Isle of Man was being reported and how media conferences were conducted under social distancing requirements.

One year on, James Davis is joined by representatives of the Island’s media to discuss just what it’s like to report the news during a global pandemic and continue to do so in what appears to be our new digital-only world.

YouTube Originals: How Content Creators & Audience Trends Inspire the Commissioning Strategy

Luke Hyams, Head of Originals EMEA at YouTube, discusses how trends and passions on the platform inform and inspire commissioned content, how YouTube Originals fits within the wider streaming community and just how YouTube truly becomes somewhere with something for everyone in a session hosted by Rhianna Dhillon, 6Music Film & TV Critic.

All About TV Casting | RTS Futures

Casting professionals discuss their TV careers working on shows such as Love Island, Saturday Night Takeaway, The Voice, and Take Me Out, and provide top tips on how to get into TV casting.

Henry Byrne, Casting Producer, Bianca Clayton, Casting Assistant Producer, Lewis Evans, Series Producer, Mo Mohsin, Casting Producer and Charlotte Welsh, Casting Researcher, join Lauren Evans, ITV Entertainment Talent Manager, for the RTS Futures event. 

How to cut TV’s carbon footprint

Each hour of television produced leaves a ­carbon footprint of 9.2 tonnes, which is the equivalent of two households’ annual consumption. This startling figure is the average across all genres – quadruple it for drama.

That was the top line given by Roser Canela Mas of Albert, the pan-industry body set up to help make television production sustainable, at an RTS panel discussion, “Producing sustainable TV – myth or reality?”.

Sustainable TV - myth or reality?

Roser Canela-Mas, Industry Sustainability Manager, BAFTA / Albert, said that last year on average making an hour of TV in the UK was responsible for generating 9.2 tons of carbon.  

This was equivalent to the annual carbon footprint of two UK households, she said, using gas and electricity.    

Producing drama, which often involves filming overseas, had a greater impact – generating around 38 tons of carbon per hour.