BBC News

Sanjoy Majumder: Our Friend in Bangladesh

Sanjoy Majumder (Credit: BBC)

Landing a major assignment or, as modest journalists would prefer to phrase it, getting your teeth into a powerful story, can sometimes be a mix of good fortune and the result of a sequence of random, unrelated events.

Towards the end of August 2017, my team and I were preparing to head out to Bangladesh to cover floods in the north of the country. It was not particularly unusual – sadly, Bangladesh experiences them every year. The situation was severe but certainly not the worst in its history.

Jeremy Bowen: You don’t just go to wars for the sake of it

“It’s an all-consuming job which can be immensely satisfying, but it demands a great deal and you have to be prepared to make that commitment… Sounds awful [but] it’s a lot of fun and you get to travel and someone else pays for it.”

Bowen has become a household name during his 33 year career at the BBC, reporting from conflict zones across the world. He can still reel off the names of the hotels he’s stayed in while reporting from El Salvador, Bosnia, Croatia and Iraq. “I’m a bit obsessed with hotels,” he admits.

BBC News launches recruitment scheme for journalists with disabilities

Credit: BBC

BBC News’ Mobile and Online teams will create twelve new positions across a wide range of content for people with disabilities, including broadcast journalists and assistant editors.

The scheme will include bespoke training and a mentoring programme, and at least half of the roles will become permanent at the end of the year.

Information about how to apply will be available shortly on the BBC Careers website.

8 steps to success: Journalist Benjamin Zand gives his tips on getting started

Zand at the 2016 RTS Television Journalism Awards (Credit: Richard Kendal)

Benjamin’s career began while still at university where he launched a travel website, Informed Explorer and began producing video content. He is now the editor of BBC Pop Up, a mobile bureau which travels the world making current affairs documentaries, as well as a programme maker for Panorama, the BBC’s long running investigative series.

Born in Liverpool and without any connections in journalism or the BBC, Zand has forced his way up through hard work and talent, and along the way he has picked up a lot of handy advice.

 

Facebook Live: The new tool for storytelling

The second US Presidential debate, on 9 October (Credit: AP)

When Philando Castile was shot dead by a police officer in Minnesota earlier this year, the world watched as his girlfriend broadcast the aftermath of the incident live on Facebook Live. The social media giant’s new live-video tool, has turned anyone with a smart­phone into a potential broadcaster.

Where users once only had the option to update their status with thrilling (or not so thrilling) written updates, live video now joins photos, recorded videos and emojis as a way to update friends and followers.

What the SNP's 'Team 56' means for broadcasting

BBC Scotland

With Team 56 – as SNP MPs call themselves – forming the third-largest party in Parliament, the impact on broadcasting in the UK is likely to be profound. And the effects are certain to spread beyond the BBC Charter debate.

The economist Jeremy Peat, a former BBC Scotland Governor and Trustee, observes that the general election outcome "represents a massive vote for change," requiring "not sticking plaster, but fundamental change." He adds: "We are miles away from a stable equilibrium."