BBC Wales

Obituary: Mari Griffith, 1940-2019

Mari Griffith with former RTS Cymru Wales Chair Tim Hartley

It was the measure of her professionalism and wit that she could offer advice while gently chiding her fellow continuity announcers.

Mari Griffith, though, was much more than a radio announcer. She was, in turn, a singer, presenter, independent producer and, in her later years, a successful novelist. Mari, who has died at the age of 79, was also a long-standing RTS Wales Centre Committee member.

Gareth Reid named RTS/Atos Young Technologist of the Year

Gareth Reid (Credit: Richard Kendal)

Reid, who graduated from the BBC Broadcast Engineering scheme after joining as an apprentice in 2013, receives an all-expenses paid trip to the broadcasting trade show, IBC, in Amsterdam this September.  

The young engineer was chosen to receive the award, which is sponsored by digital technology giant Atos, by a panel of industry judges, chaired by digital media consultant Terry Marsh. “It was a very strong field this year, however Gareth stood out immediately,” said Marsh.

Dan Snow to explore secret past of his ancestor Lloyd George in new documentary

Dan Snow BBC Wales

Snow admits to having some conflicting emotions when researching his great-great-grandfather. “He was a notorious womaniser, whose long-running relationship with his young secretary meant that he almost had two wives. I’m descended from one of Lloyd George’s daughters, so this other side of his life has always been a bit of a family secret, something we never talked about.”

Jane Tranter: Give Wales a Chance

Jane Tranter (Credit: Bad Wolf)

Before 2005 and the production of Doctor Who in Cardiff, Wales was always seen by the BBC – including me – as the “problem child”. But, just as with a “problem child” in a classroom, alarmingly, the problem is more often with the teacher/adult than the child; invariably, “problem children” are the most interesting in class and mature into the best of adults.

Our Friend in the West: Huw Jones

Huw Jones

For the past 12 months, the message from Westminster regarding BBC Charter review has been that nothing would happen before the election. Now, of course, it’s as if a starting pistol has been fired.

This is particularly so with sections of the press going into a frenzy of anticipation, based on certain previous statements by the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, John Whittingdale.

In Wales, the interviews I’ve been asked to do as Chair of S4C have all been about what it might mean for the future of the Welsh-language channel.