IBC

Lawrence Card named RTS Young Technologist of the Year 2019

Lawrence Card (Credit: BBC Academy)

Card has spent the last two years on the BBC Broadcast Engineer Trainee graduate scheme, working towards his MSc in Broadcast Engineering.

During this time, Card has worked with the Radio Projects, World Service Distribution and Research and Development’s Immersive and Interactive content team.

Card is currently investigating how AI and machine learning can assist programme teams who require vision monitoring for his final project.

RTS London: IBC Review

The International Broadcasting Convention (IBC) drew almost 56,000 people to Amsterdam in September, a small decrease on the year before. However, the number of conference delegates increased by 14% on the year before.

Channel 4 chief operating officer Keith Underwood, who chaired the IBC content steering group this year, argued that the annual media entertainment and technology show had been a success.

Gareth Reid named RTS/Atos Young Technologist of the Year

Gareth Reid (Credit: Richard Kendal)

Reid, who graduated from the BBC Broadcast Engineering scheme after joining as an apprentice in 2013, receives an all-expenses paid trip to the broadcasting trade show, IBC, in Amsterdam this September.  

The young engineer was chosen to receive the award, which is sponsored by digital technology giant Atos, by a panel of industry judges, chaired by digital media consultant Terry Marsh. “It was a very strong field this year, however Gareth stood out immediately,” said Marsh.

IBC Review, joint Southern/Thames Valley event

Despite the prevalence of artificial intelligence and machine learning at the Amsterdam broadcasting technology show – which some fear could see people replaced by machines in the industry – the panellists were optimistic about what they saw.

Peter Owen, a part-time consultant for IBC, offered a brief history of the trade fair, from humble beginnings at London’s Royal Lancaster Hotel in 1967 with just 32 exhibitors and 500 delegates, to today’s behemoth of 1,600 exhibitors with 55,000 delegates from 170 countries.

How TV can keep up with technology: IBC review

This was the key message from the London Centre’s review of this September’s IBC, which was held jointly with the Institution of Engineering and Technology at the latter’s sumptuously refurbished HQ on the banks of the Thames.

Amsterdam’s annual media technology event welcomed more than 1,600 exhibitors and 55,000 visitors to its exhibition halls and conference sessions. The RTS and IET are two of the six partners behind IBC.

London looks back at the IBC

panoscope

Amsterdam’s annual media technology jamboree was dominated by three themes – Ultra-HDTV, virtual reality and the shift to an IP-based infrastructure – according to the experts assembled for London Centre’s annual review of IBC.

“I go to IBC to see what’s maturing in the industry to the point where it rolls out into the mass market,” said Nigel Walley, Managing Director of media consultancy Decipher.

Will people be manipulated by machines in future?

Renowned futurist David Wood has warned against a world in which “technology runs out of control” and viewers and consumers are “manipulated” by machines.

Wood was speaking on the “Accelerating digital revolution” at a special members-only London Centre event, hosted at IBC, in October.

The futurist, he explained, “anticipates a set of possible futures, including things that could go very badly [wrong], but, equally, is looking for opportunities”. Before embarking on a career as a technological seer, Wood was a pioneer of the smartphone industry.