technology

Apply to be RTS Young Technologist 2017 - deadline extended

Aimed at early career engineers in broadcasting or its related industries, the award celebrates the new talent making its mark on the industry.

The RTS Young Technologist of the Year Award is open to those working for fewer than five years within the technical side of broadcasting or its related industries. 

Judges will look for applicants who can already demonstrate their contribution to their sector and who have a good overview of the industry as a whole.

RTS London: Protecting our TV heritage

Will Pitt, head of sport​ at video management specialists Imagen, was talking at an upbeat joint RTS Archive Group/RTS London event, “Protecting our TV heritage”, in early March.

He was backed by BFI head of conservation Charles Fairall, who noted that the digitisation of TV archive material has made it “instantly accessible”.

Is the future of TV in global tech companies hands?

IBC technology advisor Mark Smith predicted that 5G would boost the power of mobile networks to distribute media and entertainment content.

Deloitte media consultant Khalid Hayat forecast a future of cloud-based multi-platform, high-speed networks, feeding a wide range of platforms and devices, with not just subscription video on demand (SVoD) but cheaper, ad-sup- ported VoD at perhaps half the subscription rates.

The next generation of women taking on tech in TV

RTS bursary alumni Abbie Howell (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

The RTS launched its Technology Bursary Scheme in 2015. The initiative supports students from lower-­income households studying science, technology, engineering or maths (Stem) subjects, with the aim of tempting them into a career in the media industry when they graduate.

Our first group of five students comprised four men and one woman. This year, we awarded eight bursaries. For the first time, we have equal numbers of male and female students. Is this a blip, or are we moving towards a more equal gender balance?

The technical evolution of TV is explored at Thames Valley

Television is experiencing a technical revolution in broadcast facilities. This new technology – video and audio over IP – uses computer networks to replace traditional broadcast infrastructures to deliver more flexibility and scalability for programme-makers.

Sports producers have already started to benefit from IP. Multiple cameras and microphones at events can be directly streamed into a centralised broadcast facility to increase the number of events covered. Scalable IP studios provide pay-as-you-go resources to improve efficiency and reduce costs.

IBC 2019 examines the rise of 8K

IBC keynote speaker Andy Serkis performing in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (Credit: 20th Century Fox)

Ask attendees of this year’s IBC about what caught their eye at the giant Amsterdam tech fest, and only a few will cite new product launches.

Instead, they’ll talk about the technology trends that were evident at the trade show, and about how they left the event with a far better understanding of the future direction of travel in the complex and ever-evolving world of broadcast technology.

Guest post: Transforming TV by going back to the future

Call it a tale of two industries. For the vast global television sector, this is the best of times and the worst of times. This is a golden age of television.

Cinema-quality programmes such as Game of Thrones draw massive audiences. Events such as the 2018 FIFA World Cup, broadcast in real time to a global viewership of 1.1 billion, prove the medium’s unique power to bring together truly massive live audiences.