technology

How TV can keep up with technology: IBC review

This was the key message from the London Centre’s review of this September’s IBC, which was held jointly with the Institution of Engineering and Technology at the latter’s sumptuously refurbished HQ on the banks of the Thames.

Amsterdam’s annual media technology event welcomed more than 1,600 exhibitors and 55,000 visitors to its exhibition halls and conference sessions. The RTS and IET are two of the six partners behind IBC.

PQ and HLG Interoperability with Peter Wilson

HDR is the next major development in Ultra-HD/4K television, vastly improving contrast and detail to enhance the viewer experience.

Wilson dismissed some of the myths that have built up about the new technology: tube cameras and cathode ray tube televisions are not HDR; and the first innovators of this new technology provided charge-coupled image devices for post-tube cameras.

In fact, it was transfer knees and slope processors that compressed highlights and stopped bright detail from blowing out, providing better peak definition for standard television sets.

Will people be manipulated by machines in future?

Renowned futurist David Wood has warned against a world in which “technology runs out of control” and viewers and consumers are “manipulated” by machines.

Wood was speaking on the “Accelerating digital revolution” at a special members-only London Centre event, hosted at IBC, in October.

The futurist, he explained, “anticipates a set of possible futures, including things that could go very badly [wrong], but, equally, is looking for opportunities”. Before embarking on a career as a technological seer, Wood was a pioneer of the smartphone industry.

Haydn Jones: In praise of the functional model of IT

It requires clarity – clarity of thought and clarity of action. It means being able to align technology deployment along business units and service capabilities. It means being able to distinguish between the cost of running the business and the cost of changing the business and it means being able to delineate effective spend from wasteful spend. This applies whether you are shipping cement or filming the next Happy Valley.  

RTS ANNOUNCES 2015 UNDERGRADUATE BURSARY RECIPIENTS

television, bursary student, RTS,

The RTS has this year invested £75,000 in two schemes – offering 20 bursaries for Television Production and Broadcast Journalism students and, for the first time, five bursaries for Computing and Engineering undergraduates. The bursaries aim to widen participation in media and related industries and support talented students from lower income backgrounds seeking to pursue a career in television. During their studies, each recipient will be given £1,000 per year to assist with their expenses.

The future of media in an age of transformative technologies

September’s International Broadcasting Convention (IBC) will mark the transition from hype to reality for a wide range of transformative new technologies. Attendees of the week-long broadcasting conference and exhibition in Amsterdam will be able to assess the growing impact of Ultra-HDTV, big data and Cloud computing.

It is no coincidence that IBC has themed its entire conference as “The future of media in an age of disruption”.