RTS

Comedy legend returns to Leeds

Barry Cryer

Yorkshire RTS invited Barry Cryer back to his Leeds birthplace for an evening of showbiz anecdotes. The comedian and writer, who turned 80 earlier this year, showed a sell-out crowd that he has lost none of his wit and sparkle.

The event took place in mid-October at the atmospheric Trinity Church in Leeds, just yards away from where Cryer started his extraordinary career, the City Varieties Music Hall.

Fonejacker star Kayvan Novak to present Channel 4 news spoof

Fonejacker writer and star Kayvan Novak has been commissioned to present spoof news bulletins under the working title Britain Today, Tonight.

The comedian will be disguised as a range of personalities including politicians and an American news anchor. He will also spend part of the new show winding up members of the public and pulling pranks on celebrities and politicians.

RTS announces eight new Vice Presidents, including Doreen Lawrence and Tony Hall

Tony Hall

The Royal Television Society has announced the appointment of eight Vice Presidents, including Baroness Doreen Lawrence and Lord (Tony) Hall, Director General of the BBC.

The other appointments are David Abraham (CEO, C4); Lord (Melvyn) Bragg; Adam Crozier (CEO, ITV); Armando Iannucci; Ian Jones (CEO, S4C); and Gavin Patterson (CEO, BT).

What I’m watching with...the writers of Humans

From writing about what happens in a fictional five star luxury hotel to artificial intelligence, Sam Vincent and Jonathan Brackley have had a successful career in British television writing.

In 2009 the pair received their first drama credit for BBC One's Hotel Babylon. 

A year later they began writing episodes for BAFTA winning Spooks (MI-5) and soon became the programme’s leading writers.

Now they are the writers of sci-fi Channel 4 show Humans, which explores the presence of synths (human-like-robots) in people’s homes. 

London looks back at the IBC

panoscope

Amsterdam’s annual media technology jamboree was dominated by three themes – Ultra-HDTV, virtual reality and the shift to an IP-based infrastructure – according to the experts assembled for London Centre’s annual review of IBC.

“I go to IBC to see what’s maturing in the industry to the point where it rolls out into the mass market,” said Nigel Walley, Managing Director of media consultancy Decipher.

TV in 2020: All roads lead to content, say experts

Adam Crozier, David Abraham, Lorraine Heggessey, Tom Mockridge and Tony Hall (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

It was time to take stock. After three days of intense and stimulating debate, Lorraine Heggessey corralled some of broadcasting’s big beasts onstage to chew the fat at the final session of Cambridge 2015. Was television heading for Happy Valley or was the House of Cards about to collapse?

Does TV's top talent have too much power?

Jeremy Clarkson

Since Jeremy Clarkson punched his Top Gear producer, Oisin Tymon, during a row over the lack of a hot meal, the problems of managing talent have been centre stage.

Former BBC Controller of Entertainment Commissioning Jane Lush said that the fracas distilled some of the key questions that executives and programme-makers face: “How power­ful is talent, where do you draw the line on bad behaviour and is top talent really irreplaceable?”