politics

Inside Sky's Election Campaign: Covering the election off air and online with Richard Evans

Evans oversees all of the social media platforms for Sky News and manages the channel's relationship with those platforms - an exciting position to have in the midst of an impromptu election period. 

There is so much online engagement surrounding the election, how much does social media represent the voting public and how can Sky get the facts across in a way that will interest people? 

We spoke to Evans about how people engage online during an election, how Sky News use social media for such events, and what they have in store for election night.

Inside Sky's Election Campaign: Steering the ship on election night with Nick Phipps

That message rings out again when I talk to Nick Phipps. Phipps is the Election Night Editor of Sky News’ 2017 Election results show – a position he first held in 2014 for the Scottish Referendum, and then at every major national vote since.

His turn in the hot seat came about because he asked for it.

“I spoke to [Head of Sky News] John Ryley,” he recalls, and asked the Sky boss for the opportunity. “He very kindly said OK.”

Inside Sky's Election Campaign: What is Sky 250? with Valerie Hamill

The project puts the broadcaster live at 250 declarations across the country, from Witney to the Western Isles, and from Hastings to Hartlepool.

Sky 250 builds on Sky’s world record-breaking coverage of the 2015 election, which put them at 150 declarations. That project took over a year to organise, this time they had just seven weeks to do it all again – but bigger.

Overseeing the organisation of the Sky 250 project is Valerie Hamill, who has been tasked with recruiting over 300 personnel, organising the tech and liaising with 150 count locations.

Sky News claims to have been cut out of Tory election coverage

The broadcaster has released a statement today claiming that “since early in the election campaign, Sky News has not been getting live interviews on election issues with Conservative ministers. Also we weren’t initially invited to follow the leader’s tour,” a Sky spokesperson claimed.

The RTS understand that Sky News was offered places on Theresa May’s campaign bus on Tuesday 16th May – four days after it was initially launched. However access to the Prime Minister and her team is still being denied.

Inside Sky's Election Campaign: Deconstructing the election guidelines with Peter Lowe

Peter Lowe is the Managing Editor of Sky News, and the man responsible for ensuring that the broadcaster meets its commitments to impartiality and unbiased reporting - something broadcasters are legally required to do under the Communications Act 2003. 

News reporting, both in and outside of election season, must be fair and unbiased, it must show 'due impartiality', which Peter explains below, and 'due accuracy', meaning that the accuracy needed must be satisfactory and appropriate to the content. 

May & Corbyn face the public on Sky News and Channel 4

The special programme, to be broadcast on Monday 29th May, has been announced as part of Sky’s coverage of the upcoming General Election, and will feature the first leader interviews of the campaign in front of a live audience.  

In the 90-minute programme, Islam will begin with an audience Q&A before Paxman steps in to interview the respective party leader, before the process is repeated with the other party leader. .

Inside Sky's Election Campaign: Covering the Election with Esme Wren

As part of the RTS Inside Sky’s Election Campaign series, Sky’s Head of Politics, Specialist and Business Journalism Esme Wren, who is overseeing the broadcaster's election coverage, reveals her plans for covering the surprise General Election.

For the broadcaster, getting outside of London is key to covering the campaign, after lessons learned from the Brexit and 2015 General Election coverage where the opinion polls were out of touch with the final result.

Damian Collins: The MP influencing the TV sector

Five months into the role of Chair of the Culture, Media and Sport Committee of the House of Commons, and Damian Collins MP has consolidated a reputation as a well-informed politician with a decent grasp of key issues, ranging from fake news to the complexities of press regulation, post-Leveson.

His recent appearance at the Oxford Media Convention enhanced that reputation, with a speech stressing the seriousness of the fake news phenomenon.

The rise of Sunday morning political shows

With the arrival last May of Peston on Sunday on ITV to add to The Andrew Marr Show and Andrew Neil’s The Sunday Politics on the BBC, the Sunday morning TV political audience seemed to be very well catered for.

Yet, Sky’s head of news, John Ryley, thought there might be room for another competitor and a different approach. With this in mind, he talked it over with his young political correspondent, Sophy Ridge.

Will politics ignite a new golden age of TV satire?

The disruptive, combative political landscape created by Brexit and the election of Donald Trump is, on the face of it, a gift for UK television satirists and their venerable tradition of biting and often brutal parody.

While Theresa May’s blandness may do little to whet a satirist’s appetite, Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage bring larger-than-life personas to Brexit. And Trump is, well, Trump.