Channel 4

How to uncover the truth in investigative journalism

All the President's Men (Credit: Warner Bros)

Arguably, the world has rarely been more in need of investigative journalism. Corrupt politicians; election meddling, state repression, business shenanigans, cheating in sport.… the list is endless. An RTS Futures event in May was therefore timely, with leading journalists discussing how they seek to right wrongs and bring the powerful to justice. 

Truth seeking is not for the faint-hearted: it requires exhaustive research and dogged patience – and, for those journalists investigating the world’s most oppressive regimes, bravery. In truth, it’s probably a young person’s game. 

Writers share the need for drama in good comedy

Back to Life (Credit: BBC)

Comedy, the late, great Tony Hancock would often tell his dinner guests, was simply “frustration, misery, boredom, worry – all the things people suffer from”.

This may go some way to explaining the success of a crop of deceptively simple, single-camera comedy-dramas that have all but replaced our more traditional idea of the sitcom in the television schedules.

Gurinder Chadha: The relationship between Britain and India didn’t just start in the 1960s

Gurinder Chadha (Credit: Rex Features)

It’s 4pm on a Friday afternoon, a time of the week when most of us are preparing to wind down the working week. Not Gurinder Chadha, co-creator and director of ITV’s new period drama, Beecham House, otherwise known as “Downton in Delhi”.

She’s at work in a Soho edit suite, putting the finishing touches to another project, her latest movie, Blinded by the Light. The film is based on journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor’s memoir, Greetings from Bury Park.

RTS London hear how to make the most out of music

Alex Jones and Matt Baker in The One Show (Credit: BBC/Ray Burmiston)
Currently, he argued, this doesn’t always happen – with composers and programme-makers often failing to sing from the same song sheet.
 
Hexel recalled a quote from Rachel Portman, who won an Oscar for her score for the 1996 movie version of Jane Austen’s Emma. “Many good directors are bad at giving good direction to composers,” she said.
 

Jason Fox heads to Afghanistan for new Channel 4 series

Jason Fox (Credit: Channel 4)

Return To Afghanistan With Jason Fox (w/t) follows Fox as he embarks on a personal journey back to Afghanistan to gain a better understanding of the complex country and determine if the sacrifices were worth the legacy the conflict has left behind.

The elite Special Forces soldier will encounter former enemies, old friends and revisit where he developed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder after harrowing combat experiences, causing him to leave behind a career he loved.

“Afghanistan defined me as a soldier and made me the man I am today,” said Jason Fox.