All3Media

Jane Turton discusses her new role as Chair of the RTS and her love of television

From her first days working in television as a founder member of Meridian, the South of England regional ITV company, Jane Turton knew that she’d landed in exactly the right place professionally.

“I’ve always loved being in TV. It’s full of interesting people,” she says. “TV is always exciting. The product – if we’re allowed to call it that – is fascinating – part manufacturing business, part creative, part art, part commerce. TV brings all that stuff together in a way that is challenging and interesting.”

How traditional broadcasters can tackle the rising threat of streaming services

From left: Julian Bellamy, Howard Devine, Kirsty Wark, Jane Turton and Dan McGolpin (Credit: RTS/Richard Kendal)

The BBC has responded to the rise of subscription video-on-demand services by extending the iPlayer catch-up window from 30 days to one year.

BBC iPlayer chief Dan McGolpin defended the decision: “TV works in seasons… it means that things which are on a yearly cycle, such as The Apprentice, will be there.” He claimed that audiences, months after transmission, can now be “substantial” – some 40% of Killing Eve’s audience came to the thriller after the original catch-up window.

Online content comes of age

Share the Hair (Credit: Barcroft TV)

There’s a long-standing TV industry conception that online original content is too low in quality, too niche and too difficult to make profitable. But that view is starting to look obsolete thanks to inventive ­digital-first companies such as Barcroft Studios, Little Dot Studios and others. Successful business models for premium online content are emerging as both profits and awards start to roll in.

RTS bursary students and mentors celebrate scheme’s success

Jonathan Brackly, Natalia Wiktorovicz, Joseph McCawley and Sam Vincent (Credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

Addressing the students and mentors, RTS Education Chair Graeme Thompson said: “You are part of a thriving project, which is making a difference to representation in the TV and screen industry. We fervently believe that we reach the parts that others in the industry can’t reach – and that’s fantastic for the diversity of our industry.”

Jane Turton’s TV diary

The temperature in London has plummeted to a 10-year low and the snow has arrived. Our top-floor o­ffice in Covent Garden has the most amazing views over Westminster and all the way round to the Gherkin and the Shard. It’s very beautiful in the snow.

To add to the chaos created by the weather, Prithi, my assistant, is in Costa Rica on a two-week holiday.

I start the week with a conference call to our German supervisory board. Germany is a strong growth market for All3, where we produce scripted reality, drama and entertainment shows.

Gordon Ramsay launches production company

Ramsay, famous for programmes The F Word and Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares, will own the company outright but has already announced a joint venture deal with All3Media to get projects off the ground.

“We really look forward to continuing our relationship with Gordon, working alongside him as he establishes and grows his new production company, Studio Ramsay,” said Jane Turton, CEO of All3Media. “He is a world class talent with a phenomenal record of hit TV series.”

In pictures: RTS Cambridge Convention 2015

The RTS Cambridge Convention 2015 took place from Wednesday 16 to Friday 18 September, seeing senior leaders from the television industry on both sides of the Atlantic converge on the city. 

The topics covered over the three days ranged from the importance of the BBC worldwide, to a debate about the lessons learnt from the General Election 2015, to the continued challenge that the television industry faces with the rise of video content emerging on digital platforms. 

Jane Turton: We can do bigger, better, challenging things

There was a great deal of quiet satisfaction across the British production sector when Jane Turton was named Chief Executive of All3Media back in February. The steely, 53-year-old Scot had triumphed over external candidates following a five-month, global search by its new US owners, hard-driving Discovery Communications and Liberty Global, who paid around £550m for this important producer.

Stephen Lambert on revolutionising television

Stephen Lambert

Stephen Lambert looks a bit like Lenin – bald, with steely blue eyes and a bit unyielding. He can claim to be the man who revolutionised factual television, bringing us so many of the formats that dominate the schedules, from Wife SwapThe Secret Millionaire and Undercover Boss to Faking It.

His most recent hit is Gogglebox, the Channel 4 offering that united David Cameron and Nick Clegg in admiration, when asked during the election campaign which shows they enjoyed.