BAME

Beyond Tokenism – Cardiff

Creative Diversity Network and RTS Wales are inviting the Welsh unscripted production community to take part in an in-depth conversation about diversity and representation on-screen. 

Areas for consideration include casting diverse contributors (with a particular focus on disabled and BAME contributors), appropriate use of language and reflecting the whole of Wales.

This is an opportunity for everyone to share their own experiences and open up the discussion on the challenges and choices around representation.

Broadcast Hotshots shine at RTS Futures event

RTS Futures and Broadcast Magazine BAME Hotshots Christmas Party at the Hospital Club

RTS Futures turned the spotlight on TV’s diversity – or lack of it – at its final event of the year where a panel of young Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) talent revealed their struggles and triumphs in the industry.
 
The panel was drawn from Broadcast’s 26 BAME Hot Shots of 2015, which the magazine announced in August.
 

Channel 5 to partner up with BAME owned production companies

Ben Frow (Credit: The TV Collective)

The new initiative is part of the commitment made by channel 5 to create mainstream programmes that accurately reflect contemporary Britain.

The TV Collective was founded ten years ago by Simone Pennant and promotes the commercial and creative value that having diversity can bring to British film and TV studios.

Channel 5 are looking for nine small or medium size BAME companies, primarily based in the regions, who are owned and managed by BAME talent.

Beyond Tokenism: Reflecting diversity on-screen

Areas for consideration include casting diverse contributors (with a particular focus on disabled and BAME contributors), appropriate use of language and reflecting the whole of Wales.

This is an opportunity for everyone to share their own experiences and open up the discussion on the challenges and choices around representation.

The free-of-charge event will be held at Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff on June 6th.

Lenny Henry blasts Ofcom 'Fake Diversity' targets

Speaking at an event at the Houses of Parliament earlier this week, RTS Fellow Lenny Henry criticised new Ofcom diversity targets which only focus on those in-front of the camera, saying that it would promote “fake diversity”.

In the speech, attended by members of parliament, the public and representatives of the broadcast industry, he argued that the regulator should also require the BBC to report on the number of BAME staff working behind the scenes.

Creative Access places 700th intern

Lenny Henry with some of the 2016 Creative Access interns (Credit: Creative Access)

The organisation, which sets out to “change the face of media” has made a major impact on the creative industries in the UK since its launch in 2012.

CEO for Creative Access, Josie Dobrin explained the need for the programme, saying “The economic rationale for Creative Access is clear: our sector needs to diversify in order to continue to grow and succeed in serving new markets and new audiences.”

Creative Access has placed 700 young BAME candidates in six-month or year-long internships in over 260 different companies including BBC, ITV and Twitter.

BBC launches new diversity strategy

Targets of the campaign include increasing on screen representation of the LGBT community and reserving more internship placements for disabled people.

The aim is to set new standards for the television industry and better reflect the diversity represented in the general British public.

“The BBC has a breadth and scale that is unique in the UK’s media, and that means what we do has real impact," said Director-General, Tony Hall.

Breaking the mould

Channel 4, television, diversity, RTS, BAME, Ade Rawcliffe, Chewing Gum, Creative Diversity Manager,

Back in the late 1990s, Ade Rawcliffe was working on Ainsley Harriott’s show, Party of a Lifetime. They were in Teesside, filming with children from a housing estate. They all had a question: was Rawcliffe Harriott’s wife or was she his “girlfriend”?

Ade (pronounced Addy) thinks that they were not used to seeing two black people in the same place at once. They might, it occurs to me, have been equally puzzled by the spectacle of two black people working on the same television programme.

Channel 4 launches Year of Disability

China, Beijing, Paralympics, 2008

The focus on disability coincides with the Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro and aims to build upon the ongoing initiatives outlined in last year's 360° Diversity Charter which aimed to improve access for all under-represented groups such as BAME, LGBT and women.

In 2017, Channel 4 will focus on a different diversity theme.