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Social Media Muscles in on TV

The way we access content is fundamentally changing.  Shorter-form content continues to grow apace and, at the same time, viewing is fragmenting across myriad devices and screens.  Helping drive this change has been the emergence of a new generation of distribution platforms that blend professional video, user generated content and social media.

Have We Got News for You? asks BBC Points West

Jonathan Dimbleby was in the chair to lead a 90-minute discussion – “Have We Got News for You?” – on the future of local news in the regions. The panellists were journalist and academic Roy Greenslade; controller of BBC English Regions David Holdsworth; Ujima FM station manager Julz Davis; and Trinity Mirror editor Rachel Sugden.

The event featured filmed provocations from Richard Sambrook, director of the Centre for Journalism at Cardiff University, who charted the decline in print media and argued that there was a lack of local accountability.

Comic Relief and Question Time were March's most-tweeted shows

The BBC's Comic Relief coverage gained the top spot with 245,848 tweets and over 84 million impressions, with Question Time coming in second with 131,000 tweets and 31 million impressions.

Comic Relief this year raised a staggering £73,026,234, which will be used to transform lives across the UK and in some of the world’s poorest communities.

The highest tweeting entertainment show was The Voice UK, which performed better than Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway

What should social media do about fake news and online abuse?

At an RTS event about social media and television, Facebook’s Patrick Walker addressed the charge that his company had done little to stop these stories spreading.

‘We are a platform – we see ourselves first and foremost as a technology company. The mission we have is to connect people and make the world more connected, which is about sharing information,’ he said.

Why social media needs TV

News of television’s death is premature, heard a relieved RTS audience, who were assured that the US tech giants – Facebook, YouTube and Twitter – were TV’s partners, not predators.

“Television is amazingly resilient – the great thing about it, is that it’s very adaptable. It’s always been good at seizing the opportunities that new technology brings,” said YouTube’s Stephen Nuttall at the RTS early-evening event in November, “Social media muscles in on TV”.

Full Session: Social Media Muscles in on TV

Networks such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now an integral part of the UK’s video landscape. What are the implications of their growth, not just for viewers, but for content creators, traditional broadcasters and advertisers?

An expert panel, chaired by Kate Bulkley, discussed the subject at our 'Social Media Muscles in on TV' event. The panel included Dara Nasr, Managing Director, Twitter, UK; Stephen Nuttall, Senior Director, EMEA, YouTube and Patrick Walker, Director of Media Partnerships, EMEA, Facebook.

Event Report: Social media muscles in on TV

“Television is amazingly resilient. It’s always been good at seizing the opportunities that new technology brings,” said YouTube’s Stephen Nuttall at the RTS early evening event in late-November, “Social media muscles in on TV”.

“Some of the greatest innovators on social media are the television companies,” added Twitter’s UK Managing Director, Dara Nasr.

Over the past year or so, online video has become hugely important to social media companies.

Clarkson & co release first photos from Amazon's The Grand Tour

The photos were released in a series of tweets by the show's presenters and on The Grand Tour Twitter account and show the three stars recording the first of their shows in Johannesburg, South Africa. 

The show is recorded in a large tent that, along with the presenters and crew, will travel to locations across the world including Europe and America.