STV

RTS Scotland celebrates television talent at 2019 awards

On-screen Personality winner Sabrina Grant (Credit: Harrison Reid)

Cosgrove, who led the Scotland team that campaigned successfully to bring one of the Channel 4 hubs to Glasgow, is the latest recipient of the prestigious RTS Scotland Award.

The inaugural Writer award went to Lorna Martin, who adapted her best-selling book, Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, for television. Women on the Verge, a Merman/House Productions series, aired on UKTV channel W and RTÉ2.

Our Friend in Scotland: Steven Ladurantaye on his move to Glasgow

Steven Ladurantaye

I was sweltering in the heat of a classroom inside the fortress that serves as the headquarters of Vietnam’s state news broadcaster when my phone vibrated with a call from Scotland. I’d been flirting with STV News regarding a move for a few months.

Aside from my translator, none of the 20 journalists I was teaching (digital skills for broadcast journalists, since you ask) could speak English. I didn’t have to step out of the room when I fibbed and said, of course, it would be easy for me to visit Glasgow in a few days’ time for an interview for the head of news job.

STV's new Chief Executive Simon Pitts unveils new growth plan

STV CEO Simon Pitts (Credit: STV)

STV’s new drama The Victim, a legal thriller set in Scotland and made for BBC One, is told through the eyes of both plaintiff and accused. All stories have two sides to them. The narrative concerning the changes going on in Scottish broadcasting is no different.

Glasgow-based STV has a new Chief Executive, Simon Pitts, formerly ITV’s director of transformation and strategy. His new strategy has gone down well in the city and with some producers, but less so with certain journalists and politicians.

Is Scottish TV production falling behind?

ouglas Henshall starred as DI Jimmy Perez in the Scottish BAFTA-winning drama Shetland (Credit: BBC/ITV Studios/Mark Mainz)

Is the glass half full or half empty? That classic question, or cliché, is actually a really useful way to look at the production industry in Scotland. On the surface, all appears rosy. 

The BBC has survived largely intact from the Charter renewal process. Whatever emerges from the scrapping of the in-house guarantee and the establishment of BBC Studios, the corporation’s spending commitment in the nations and regions of the UK remains undamaged.  

Local TV: Here to stay

London Live's Gavin Ramjaun

If you were to believe the headlines, you might think that local television – dismis­sed by some as "Jeremy Hunt’s pipe dream" – was dead in the water. The former Culture Secretary’s vision, scorned by most broadcasters, was bulldozed on to the statute book four years ago and the first channels are now 18 months old.

Hunt thought it wrong that Birmingham, Alabama, had eight local-TV ­stations while Birmingham, UK, had none, and secured some funding and the Channel 8 slot on Freeview (in England, at least) to help the new stations get established.

What the SNP's 'Team 56' means for broadcasting

BBC Scotland

With Team 56 – as SNP MPs call themselves – forming the third-largest party in Parliament, the impact on broadcasting in the UK is likely to be profound. And the effects are certain to spread beyond the BBC Charter debate.

The economist Jeremy Peat, a former BBC Scotland Governor and Trustee, observes that the general election outcome "represents a massive vote for change," requiring "not sticking plaster, but fundamental change." He adds: "We are miles away from a stable equilibrium."