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Writers share the need for drama in good comedy

Back to Life (Credit: BBC)

Comedy, the late, great Tony Hancock would often tell his dinner guests, was simply “frustration, misery, boredom, worry – all the things people suffer from”.

This may go some way to explaining the success of a crop of deceptively simple, single-camera comedy-dramas that have all but replaced our more traditional idea of the sitcom in the television schedules.

From acting to writing: Toby Jones talks Don't Forget the Driver

Barry Green (Toby Jones) in Don't Forget the Driver (Credit: BBC Two)

You wait years for a TV comedy centred on the disruption caused by the sudden arrival of a foreign migrant in a settled world and, suddenly, two come along at once.

This spring, Channel 4 has showcased Home, Rufus Jones’s well-­received show in which his uptight character, Peter, and partner return from holiday to find a Syrian man called Sami (Youssef Kerkour) living in the boot of the family car.

Lifestyle channel Home moves to free-to-air

My Dream Derelict Home

Lifestyle channel Home will make the move from pay TV to free-to-air on 1 March.

Emma Ayech, general manager of Home, said that the channel’s move to free-to-air households “gives a greater reach to our channel, offering more viewers the opportunity to watch our great roster of much-loved shows fronted by big name talent. We’re looking forward to welcoming new audiences to our Home.”

Home replaced pay TV channel UKTV Style in 2009. It will move to channel 25, currently occupied by Dave Ja Vu, which will move to a new slot which will be announced in the coming days.

Tips in 60 seconds... How to find your audience

You've thought of a programme idea, you're about to write a winning pitch but first you need to think of your audience. Tailoring content to specific demographics is highly important in television. Clare Laycock explains how to do it.

Clare is Head of Channel TLC at Discovery Networks UK & Ireland. Previously Clare headed up Really, Home and Good Food at UKTV so she knows a thing or two about making great TV for specific audiences.