Flack

Ticket to timetravel: How Timewasters became a comedy hit

Samson Kayo (Horace), Kadiff Kirwan (Jason), Daniel Lawrence Taylor (Nick) and Adelayo Adedayo (Lauren) in Timewasters (Credit: ITV)

Timewasters has charmed critics and attracted healthy audiences with its mix of jazz, time travel and good jokes. Notably, it also has an all-black leading cast but, according to its creator, Daniel Lawrence Taylor, it is, “first and foremost”, a comedy.

Writers of Flack discuss the need for more complex on-screen female characters

Anna Paquin in Flack (Credit: UKTV/W)

GQ magazine described the new Anna Paquin drama, Flack, as “so ­terrible it might just be unmissable”. The verdict of the Daily Telegraph’s TV critic was “sharp and whizzy”, while the Observer hailed it as a “terrific and bittersweet comedy”, “in turns woefully tender and snort-funny”. Whatever you think of the female-skewing Flack, one thing is clear: it’s not a show to ignore.

The creators of Flack discuss scriptwriting at RTS Futures event

But a new high-profile drama from UKTV, Flack, starring Anna Paquin as a smart, scheming PR, was arguably ahead of the curve when the idea was first conceived by British writer Oliver Lansley seven years ago.

An RTS Futures audience heard how the show had gone through several iterations before it was eventually commissioned by UKTV’s head of scripted, Pete Thornton.

Flack was originally a half-hour comedy, then a one-hour drama and subsequently morphed into its current form – a 45-minute comedy drama that makes its debut on UKTV drama channel W this week.