diversity

Lucy Lumsden’s TV diary

Just back to Sky’s new hot-desking haven, "The Hub", after a Guinness-fuelled weekend in freezing Kilkenny at the Sky Cat Laughs Comedy Festival. Boss Stuart Murphy plonks himself opposite me, which is disastrous for concentration levels.

Tonight, it’s the Sky News party for MPs at the top of the Millbank Tower. I wish Yvette Cooper good luck; she’s wearing a baby-blue jacket – easy to spot in a sea of grey suits.

Diversity: job done? Don’t get me started...

All TV industry watchers know that, thanks largely to Lenny Henry, diversity remains high on television’s agenda. In the past year or so, the BBC, Channel 4 and Sky have each made big announcements, pledging to improve their on-screen representation of minorities and to do more to nurture and encourage multi-ethnic and diverse workforces.

But has genuine change finally kicked in? That was the question that Sky News reporter Afua Hirsch wanted answering as she chaired a packed and often emotional RTS event provocatively entitled "Diversity: job done?".

ITV’s big drama: Television speaks to drama boss Steve November

Steve November

On 18 September 2016, Steve November has a problem. At 9:00pm that night, the slot arrives in ITV’s schedule that would normally be filled by the season premiere of Downton Abbey.

As Director of Drama for the ITV network, November has to find a replacement – Downton is ending, with the last ever episode to air this coming Christmas Day. And, given Downton’s blockbuster ratings performance, it’s going to be a fiendishly difficult act to follow.

Why diversity makes business sense for TV

Making Diversity Pay

The economic arguments for diversity came under the microscope at a lively joint RTS/BBC session held at New Broadcasting House last month. The panellists agreed that, following years of inaction, broadcasters are finally making an effort to boost black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) represen­tation in television.

Survey looks at impact of diversity initiative

A survey by diversity campaign group The TV Collective has found that 83% of people believe recent diversity initiatives will not make a difference to the industry. 

Last year, TV and film in the UK introduced a range of initiatives to improve diversity both on and off screen with broadcasters such as BBC, Sky and ITV implementing new measures.

The purpose of the poll, taken by 170 people, was to investigate the impact the diversity drive had on those from varied backgrounds and highlight problems that may still occur. 

Tanni Grey-Thompson: "TV diversity has got immeasurably better but it is not as good as it needs to be"

Diversity: Job Done?

The extent of British broadcasters' new found commitment to diversity came under the spotlight at a packed RTS event provocatively entitled Diversity: Job Done?

A year ago the BBC Director-General Tony Hall unveiled plans for on and off screen BAME representation at the BBC and the setting up of new Independent Diversity Advisory Group.

Paralympian Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, a member of the group who became disabled as a child, said there had been change at the BBC in how minorities are portrayed but more work needed to be done.

Creative Skillset calls for fairer access to TV industry

Creative Skillset has said more needs to be done to provide a visible range of paid career paths and opportunities for new talent to enter the television industry.

The announcement comes after Creative Skillset's Workforce Survey found that over half of the TV workforce found their current position through informal networks and unpaid work periods are still common in TV.