David Attenborough

David Attenborough calls on the public to clean up the seas

Blue Planet II reached over 37m people in the UK alone. Following the final episode, over 60% of people surveyed commented that they wanted to make changes to their life to reduce the impact on the ocean.

The response, said Attenborough, has left him “absolutely astonished.”

“We hoped that Blue Planet II would open people’s eyes to the damage that we are doing to our oceans and the creatures that live in them.  I never imagined that there would be so many of you who would be inspired to want change.”

Attenborough returns with new BBC wildlife documentary Dynasty

Dynasty (Credit: BBC One)

Each episode will follow an individual animal – lions, hunting dogs, chimpanzees, tigers and emperor penguins – at the most critical period in their lives as they navigate the world’s rapidly changing habitats.

This series will show for the first time what an animal must do to create and maintain a dynasty, and leave a legacy in nature.

Made by the team behind Blue Planet II, the most watched programme of 2017, the BBC aims to recapture its success with new ‘intimate animal dramas’.

Our friend in the West: Julian Hector

Julian Hector (Credit: BBC)

As BBC Studios’ Natural History Unit turned 60 this autumn, 2017 was a particularly exciting and busy year. But I was nervous about whether Blue Planet II would equal the impact of Planet Earth II almost a year previously.

In November 2016, Planet Earth II attracted record TV audiences in the UK; the series went on to win RTS, Bafta and Emmy awards. That sequence of racer snakes hurling themselves at hatchling marine iguanas won a Bafta for TV’s most memorable moment.

BBC releases trailer for Blue Planet II

The trailer, titled The Prequel, features David Attenborough's narration over spectacular scenes of the Earth's oceans and the underwater inhabitants.

The five minute clip teases what is in store for the long-awaited sequel to the 2001 nature series; from slow-motion shots of blue whales soaring out of the ocean, to a glimpse of a bale of turtles occupying an entire beach as they slowly make their way to the sea, to close-ups of the extraordinary creatures on the sea floor.

Levison Wood's tips for budding explorers

Levison Wood crossing the Caucuses (Credit: Simon Buxton)

You can’t just get up one morning and decide to be an explorer.

Well, you can, but you’re not going to get on television with that attitude. You’ve got to jump through lots of hoops to get there and it’s not just a case of how many countries you’ve been to. You don’t have to join the Army to get into TV, but I think it’s good to have some level of expertise or niche knowledge. Once you’re an expert in anything, in any industry, people will come to you. That’s where you want to be.

Sir David Attenborough to become virtual hologram for Sky

In a world first, museum-goers will get special hands-on access to rare objects, while a 3D hologram of Attenborough will offer his own insight on each specimen in a one-on-one interactive experience.

He will be transformed into a hologram and will guide participants to virtually hold and handle fossils, bringing the objects to life. 

This virtual technology will allow people to hold up, peer inside, tilt and look more closely at the historic objects, which include fossils, bones and skulls from the museum’s world-famous collection.

Alastair Fothergill: How can you possibly care about the natural world if you’ve never seen it?

The Hunt

Like an entire generation of wildlife film-makers, Alastair Fothergill was drawn to television by David Attenborough. His 1979 series, Life on Earth, showed the young Fothergill that natural history programming was “a good way to be paid to be near animals”.

Fothergill, who was recently made a Fellow of the RTS, spent almost three decades at the BBC Natural History Unit (NHU). This included a five-year stint as head of department, when he landed several global hits, including The Blue Planet, Planet Earth and Frozen Planet.

Sir David Attenborough returns to present Blue Planet II

The successor to the award-winning Blue Planet from BBC Studios Natural History Unit follows the huge success of last year's Planet Earth II, also presented by Attenborough.

The seven-part documentary series has been four years in the making, with a team of wildlife filmmakers exploring the hidden depths of the earth's oceans for the return of the unique visual experience.

Sir David Attenborough said he was "truly thrilled to be joining this new exploration of the underwater worlds which cover most of our planet, yet are still its least known.”