I May Destroy You

RTS London panel asks if there is too much TV

That was the core of an RTS London discussion, “Too much TV!”, which examined how the pandemic is affecting our viewing tastes and why, despite significant progress, platforms need better curation to guide audiences through the labyrinth of peak TV.     

As all the panellists agreed, you can’t have too much great TV. Whether there is enough of it is a moot point.   

And, perhaps, ultimately, the definition of what constitutes outstanding TV is subjective.   

Michaela Coel and Cynthia Erivo to headline BBC virtual Creative Diversity Xperience

The online event will bring together some of the best talent in TV and the creative industries from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds.

Faron McKenzie, Head of CDX, said: “I’m proud that our team of creators looked like and shared a similar lived experience to our audience.

“It is important for the BBC to champion Diversity and Inclusion and not be afraid to lean into these subject matters.”

Michaela Coel: Personal and provocative

Michaela doesn’t skirt issues – she goes straight at them.” Executive producer Roberto Troni is talking about Michaela Coel’s fearless new drama I May Destroy You, which explores sexual consent in contemporary London.

The 12-part BBC One/HBO series is, to an extent, based on personal experience – like her character, Arabella, Coel was sexually assaulted after her drink was spiked, an experience she revealed two years ago while giving the MacTaggart lecture at the Edinburgh International TV Festival.

Michaela Coel’s new drama I May Destroy You heads to BBC One

Michaela Coel (Credit: BBC)

Created by, executive produced and starring Coel, I May Destroy You explores sexual consent and the minefield that is dating and relationships.

The 12-part series brings into question the fine line between liberation and exploitation in the modern landscape.

Arabella Essiuedu (Coel) finds herself hailed as the ‘voice of her generation’ when a piece of her writing receives critical acclaim.

Carefree, non-attached and easily distracted, Essiuedu lands an agent and a book commission, along with the pressure to live up to her so-called 'literary genius'.