HBO

Ear Candy: The Chernobyl Podcast

Scene from Chernobyl

Shocking. Bleak. Controversial. Devastatingly brilliant. All these descriptions are true of HBO and Sky’s five-part retelling of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. The HBO and Sky series has been one of the most talked-about dramas of the year so far, lauded by critics and helping to confirm the current golden age of TV.

At times, the events depicted in the programme were so incredible that many viewers have questioned what was real and what is made up.

BBC One commissions new four-part series from Jack Thorne

Jack Thorne (Credit: BBC)

Best Interests tells the story of two parents who must make a life-changing decision that no one could ever want to make.

Andrew and Nicci’s daughter, Marnie, suffers from a life-threatening condition to the extent that medical staff have suggested that it would be in her best interests to be allowed to die to end any suffering.

Andrew and Nicci struggle to contemplate the decision and launch a legal battle to prevent their daughter’s death.

RTS Futures NI hosts TV and film workshops

Film and TV crafts and skills workshops (Credit: Ronan Karicos)

The first event, “Sketchy business: making it in animation”, brought together a panel hosted by the university’s Dr Helen Haswell and featured three experts from Belfast animation house JAM Media: visual effects supervisor and director Niall Mooney; animator Jessica Patterson; and animation director Simon Kelleghan. They discussed how to get your foot in the door, as well as giving practical advice, including how best to structure a show reel.

Sky's Chernobyl: the disaster story that needed to be told

Chernobyl (Credit: Sky/HBO)

“I wanted to make a drama unlike anything else, because Chernobyl was unlike anything else. I wanted it to be as unique as the event itself.” That was the ambitious goal set by writer and producer Craig Mazin for his epic mini-series about the Soviet power plant that caught fire on 26 April 1986, triggering the most disastrous nuclear accident in history. And Mazin has succeeded.

Ian Katz’s TV Diary

Channel 4 (Credit: Channel 4)

Surprise hit of the week is 100 Vaginas, in which the artist Laura Dods­worth photographs the genitalia of 100 women and then talks to them about the images and how they feel about their bodies. It’s a great film – bold and political and warm – but firmly at the art-house end of the channel’s output. Everyone is delighted when it attracts an audience of more than 1 million.