GBBO

Making Shows Great Again

In recent years, we have seen such enduring favourites as Blind Date, Top Gear, Dancing on Ice and Robot Wars revamped and returned, with the aim of recapturing loyal audiences and attracting new ones.

We have seen The Great British Bake-Off switch channels and talent and receive just as much love and adoration on Channel 4 as it did on BBC. The key question is: when do you stick and when do you twist? In the company of four experienced TV executives intimately acquainted with one of TV’s great gambles, we find out….

Most memorable The Great British Bake Off moments

Credit: BBC/ Channel 4)

Over the years, many contestants have forged successful careers and made lasting impressions for both good and bad reasons.

Exposing the world to soggy bottoms, custardgate and the power of the famous Paul Hollywood handshake.

With so many memorable moments to choose from, here are some of our favourites.

Air date announced for Bake Off 2019

Prue Leith, Noel Fielding, Sandi Toksvig and Paul Hollywood (Credit: Channel 4)

Noel Fielding and Sandi Toksvig will return to present the nation’s beloved cooking show alongside returning judges Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith.

This August, a fresh batch of contestants will enter the iconic tents hoping to earn the cherished ‘Hollywood handshake’, the title of Star Baker and grab their hands on the Bake Off trophy.

Channel 4 previously released the trailer for the new series, which showed a growing ‘Bake Off Fever’ that swept across the nation.

The line-up of amateur bakers is yet to be announced.

The Great British Bake Off is back with a new series trailer

Paul Hollywood, Prue Leith, Noel Fielding and Sandi Toksvig (Credit: Channel 4)

The UK’s favourite food show will soon return to our screens and Channel 4 has released the trailer for the upcoming series. 

The upbeat trailer – set to the Beatles track, All Together Now – shows the nation overcome with 'Bake Off Fever', coming together to bake everything from cookies, to cakes, to choux pastry.

A new batch of fresh-faced amateur bakers will enter the tent, hoping to raise the coveted trophy and show off their love for baking.

The joy of food programmes

The Great British Bake Off 2018 winner Rahul Mandal (Credit: Channel 4)

With 87 days’ worth of cookery shows airing during the past year on UK terrestrial television – made up of 410 unique titles – the RTS event “Why we love… food” was appositely named.

Revealing the facts to an audience hungry for knowledge about the genre, Pritesh Mody, founder of artisan food producer World of Zing, chaired the late-May event on the day it emerged that Jamie Oliver’s UK restaurant chain had gone into administration.

Making Shows Great Again | Highlights

It is one of the greatest dilemmas in popular telly – when to persist with a popular franchise, give it a lick of paint and some new talent, and when to mothball it, only to drag it out of the store cupboard, to enchant a whole new generation of TV viewers. 

In recent years, we have seen such enduring favourites as Blind Date, Top Gear, Dancing on Ice and Robot Wars revamped and returned, with the aim of recapturing loyal audiences and attracting new ones.

Making Shows Great Again | Full video

Watch what happened at our latest event, where TV bosses discussed whether bringing back old TV formats shows that we're running out of ideas, or if some shows are just worth giving a make over for new audiences.

Journalist Caroline Frost was joined by a panel of TV experts to discuss just that.

Joining Caroline on the panel were:
Sean Doyle, Channel 5, Commissioning Editor, Blind Date
Camilla Lewis, CEO, Curve Media
Richard McKerrow, Love Productions, Executive Producer, The Great British Bake Off
Ella Umansky, Head of Format Support, ITV Studios

Should there be more TV revivals?

From left: Sean Doyle, Ella Umansky, Caroline Frost, Camilla Lewis and Richard McKerrow (Credit: RTS/Paul Hampartsoumian)
These are robust TV formats, which, over many years, bring audiences to broadcasters and profits to production companies. But they are the exception, not the rule in television.
 
At an RTS early evening event in early June, a panel of top TV execs discussed what gives formats legs.
 
The central London event took place a day after the triumphant return of ITV2’s Love Island, which attracted a peak audience of 3.4 million. The series opener averaged 2.95 million viewers, more than double last year’s first episode.