Sky

Sky and Netflix have agreed to a new multi-year deal

(Credit: Sky)

The new deal will see Sky customers have more forms of entertainment in one place, with the option to have Netflix’s Basic Plan on Sky Q.

With just one service, customers will be able to switch seamlessly between Sky and Netflix content.

From Sky original productions like Chernobyl, to new shows such as Third Day and returning shows like Save Me Too, plus Netflix’s own original roster including dramas, films and documentaries, with content such as The Witcher, The Irishman and the new series of Sex Education.

Broadcasting impartiality under siege in 2019 election campaign

Whatever your view of the result, it was a wretched and dispiriting election campaign. Politicians seldom broke away from churning out the same sound bites, and on social media there was a level of viciousness that was unbearable.

It’s therefore not exactly a surprise that the mainstream media, pressured by parties and harried by online trolls, had a rough ride in the 2019 general election, too. It is difficult, as the proverb goes, to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

Sky announces new studio at Elstree

The new studio is planned to house the production of multiple TV shows and films simultaneously and will be located in Elstree, close to the home of Star Wars and Strictly Come Dancing, Elstree Studios.

Backed by Sky’s recent new owner Comcast, the new studio will be developed in partnership with sister-company NBCUniversal and Legal & General.

First glimpse of Lennie James in Save Me Too

Nelly Rowe (Lennie James) (Credit: Sky/Sky Studios/World Productions)

Save Me Too follows the return of estranged father Nelly (Lennie James), seventeen months after his unsuccessful search for his missing daughter Jody.

Challenged to re-evaluate his life decisions, Nelly’s search forced him to take dangerous risks that dragged him into a dark underworld that trafficks kidnapped youngsters including Jody.

Jez Butterworth on his move from stage to screen with Britannia

Jez Butterworth and Tom Butterworth (credit: Paul Hampartsoumian)

Period dramas come in myriad forms. Latterly, few have been as high concept as Jez Butterworth’s bloody and somewhat bewildering saga, Britannia, set roughly 2,000 years ago as the invading Romans attempt to “civilise” an island of warring Celtic tribes.

Co-produced by Sky Atlantic and Amazon Prime Video, the skill of the make-up department alone is worth tuning in for. The prosthetic work done to Mackenzie Crook, who plays druid mystic Veran, is extraordinary.

Sky releases first look image of comedy starring Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins

Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc (Credit:Sky)

The six-part series, written and created by Joe Parkham and Joe Markham, follows two best friends, Fran (Perkins) and Jamie (Giedroyc), who only have each other to rely on as they try to move forward in the world.

The only thing is, they kill people for a living which adds a certain element of complication to their lives.

Joe Parkham and Joe Markham commented: “We can’t believe that something which has been knocking around inside our heads for so long has been brought to life by two of the funniest people in the country, along with a load of our other comedy heroes.”