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The Great British Bake Off is back with a new series trailer

Paul Hollywood, Prue Leith, Noel Fielding and Sandi Toksvig (Credit: Channel 4)

The UK’s favourite food show will soon return to our screens and Channel 4 has released the trailer for the upcoming series. 

The upbeat trailer – set to the Beatles track, All Together Now – shows the nation overcome with 'Bake Off Fever', coming together to bake everything from cookies, to cakes, to choux pastry.

A new batch of fresh-faced amateur bakers will enter the tent, hoping to raise the coveted trophy and show off their love for baking.

Channel 4 releases new GBBO trailer

The advert shows a range of singing baked goods coming together in a dazzling display of cakes, breads and tarts.

Sandi Toksvig and Noel Fielding will present the new series, alongside judges Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith.

The eighth series of the cookery show will appear on Channel 4, after Love Productions signed a deal with the broadcaster last year.

Sandi Toksvig and Noel Fielding to host Channel 4's Great British Bake Off

Comedians Sandi Toksvig (QI) and Noel Fielding (The Mighty Boosh) will host Britain’s biggest baking competition, while restaurateur and food writer Prue Leith joins Paul Hollywood as a judge.
 
The news comes after it was announced last autumn that the blockbuster baking show would be moving from BBC One to Channel 4.
 

Ant & Dec, Sir David Attenborough and Julie Walters among RTS Programme Awards nominations

At an event this morning, hosted by Countryfile’s Anita Rani, the nominees were announced, including National Treasure stars Julie Walters and Robbie Coltrane for Actor (Female) and Actor (Male) respectively, TV duo Ant and Dec for Entertainment Performance, and Bake Off’s Nadiya Hussein for Breakthrough Award.

Why are women in TV still being paid less than men?

(Credit: iStockPhoto)

Why, 46 years after the Equal Pay Act, are women in television still being paid less than men? “A man at exactly the same grade as me, with far less education and experience, and who joined the BBC after I did, was paid £10,000 more than me,” says one female staffer. 

“I am paid £5,000 less than a man on the same grade, despite having more responsibility and having worked more years on the team,” ­complains another.