Alan Partridge

BBC announce new commissions including doc on Grenfell and return of Alan Partridge

Director of BBC Content, Charlotte Moore announced a range of new commissions at the EITF from the BBC.

She said: "The new commissions I’m announcing today are examples of the range and ambition audiences can expect from the channel as we continue to challenge what mainstream television can do and connect with a diverse modern Britain."


Alan Partridge

BBC Two will broadcast a 25th anniversary special this year, marking 25 years since Alan Partridge's debut on BBC Radio back in 1992 and a BBC One series will follow in 2018.

Alan Partridge to explore broken Britain

Alan Partridge (Credit: Sky Atlantic)

In an attempt to make amends following a controversial on-air incident, the radio DJ will leave behind his life of luxury to visit the areas inhabited by the people he has offended, from supermarket staff to payday lenders.

Partridge will move among them in a bid to become what Sky has called “a better citizen, a better man and a better, more sought-after broadcaster.”

Along the way, he will ask whether a ‘schasm’ has formed – somewhere between a schism and a chasm – between the country’s ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’.

Armando Iannucci on his 20 years at the top

Armando Iannucci

By many people's reckoning, Armando Iannucci is one of our greatest and funniest TV satirists. The political classes and the grammar and conceits of television have proved fertile ground for Iannucci's wit and his team of gifted collaborators, notably Steve Coogan, Rebecca Front and Chris Morris.

Why film is a good fit for the BBC

Philomena

Christine Langan
Christine Langan (Credit: BBC)

 

Everyone knows that BBC drama is either near or at the top of its game. But what of BBC Films, the broadcaster's infinitely poorer and sometimes neglected cousin?

For the past six years, BBC Films has been led by Christine Langan, a one-time Granada script editor who went on to win acclaim within ITV and beyond.

Is television eating itself?

W1A

Will television eat itself? A flat screen might be easier to get down than a cathode-ray tube, and cause less indigestion – but, still, it doesn't really sound like a sensible diet.

 

All trades and professions are fascinated with themselves and like nothing more than talking endlessly about their own work. The TV industry is no different. In it's case, making telly about telly is proving increasingly irresistible.

 

We are all a bit too wised-up to dream about "the magic of television" any more. The schedules struggle to hold our attention.

 

Profile: Armando Iannucci, writer, producer, director, performer

Armando Iannucci

Armando Iannucci, best known for creating hit political comedies The Thick of It and Veep, began his comedy career while at university, appearing in two revues at the Edinburgh Fringe.

He entered working life at the BBC where he served as a radio producer on shows such as Just a Minute and Week Ending.

It was here that he met the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan and Rebecca Front, creating On the Hour, a satirical show that parodied news broadcasting and where Coogan debuted his notorious Alan Partridge character.